Object Advanced Search : "Aboriginal Collection"

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Registration Number E2831
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E20608
Classification CH classification INDIGENOUS CULTURES Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander plate
CH classification CIVIC MEMENTOES Souvenirs
Name or Title Wall plaque
Production Place Belgrave/Victoria/Australia
Production Date 1952-1960
History and Use

This object is from the Glenn Cooke collection of Aboriginal-themed design. In 1999 Glenn Cooke donated his collection of over 1300 domestic and souvenir wares to Queensland Museum. Together the collection provides detailed examples of how Aboriginal art and design have been adopted and reproduced in Australian popular culture. The Glenn Cooke collection dates from the 1940s, when Aboriginal design was first embraced by ‘Australiana’ industries, up until the present day. While some of the objects in the collection were made by Indigenous people, the vast majority were not. These items therefore raise a number of questions about authorship, authenticity and appropriation in Indigenous-themed design in Australia.

William ‘Bill’ Onus and his brother Eric established ‘Aboriginal Enterprise Novelties’ in the Dandenong Ranges, Victoria in 1952. Bill adopted similar imagery to that which appeared in mass-produced indigenised design; however, he used such works to draw attention to his political work with the ‘Committee for Aboriginal Citizen Rights’ and the ‘Australian Aborigines League.’

The image on this plate has been copied from photographs of Gwoja Tjungurrayi (1895-1965), a Warlpiri-Anmatyerre man photographed by Roy Dunstan and published in the magazine 'Walkabout' in 1935 and 1950. This image became known as ‘One Pound Jimmy’ and was reproduced by many artists and decorators.

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Registration Number E20870
Classification CH classification TOURISM
CH classification Homewares
Name or Title Wall Hanging
Production Place Sydney/New South Wales/Australia
Production Date 1954-1958
History and Use

The hanging is an appropriated design of a Rainforest shield depicting the 'Star fish' totem of an Aboriginal group near Cairns. Since the Second World War it has been a popular practice to 'Indigenise' commercial designs to make them more 'Australian'. An image of the shield depicted in this design was first publicised by Ursula McConnel in ‘Inspiration and design in Aboriginal art’ in ‘Art in Australia’, 59 (Third Series, 15 May 1935), 1935, p.61, where she identified the design as ‘Star fish (dyd:ra madydi)’ belonging to the Gunggandji people in Yarrabah. The original shield is held in the South Australian Museum

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number E20543
Name or Title Bag - Kangaroo Skin
Production Place Australia
West Central/Queensland/Australia
History and Use

This bag was made by Aboriginal people for carrying water over long distances. The kangaroo skin was tanned with bloodwood gum and the orifices were sealed with human hair. These bags were popular around Boulia and towards the Northern Territory border. They were called Nilpa by the Pitta Pitta people in Boulia and Norlo by the Kalkadoon people to the north.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E2848
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940. Chaseling was the first Reverend at the Yirrkala Mission, which was established in 1935. Yirrkala Mission was the last mission to be established in eastern Arnhem Land.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E2845
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940. Chaseling was the first Reverend at the Yirrkala Mission, which was established in 1935. Yirrkala Mission was the last mission to be established in eastern Arnhem Land.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E2841
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940. Chaseling was the first Reverend at the Yirrkala Mission, which was established in 1935. Yirrkala Mission was the last mission to be established in eastern Arnhem Land.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E2846
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940. Chaseling was the first Reverend at the Yirrkala Mission, which was established in 1935. Yirrkala Mission was the last mission to be established in eastern Arnhem Land.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E2847
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940. Chaseling was the first Reverend at the Yirrkala Mission, which was established in 1935. Yirrkala Mission was the last mission to be established in eastern Arnhem Land.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E2835
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940. Chaseling was the first Reverend at the Yirrkala Mission, which was established in 1935.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E2838
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940. Chaseling was the first Reverend at the Yirrkala Mission, which was established in 1935.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E2832
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940. Chaseling was the first Reverend at the Yirrkala Mission, which was established in 1935. Yirrkala Mission was the last mission to be established in eastern Arnhem Land.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E2849
Name or Title Spear thrower
Production Place Yirrkala/Northern Territory/Australia
Production Date Pre 1940
History and Use

Wamara is derived from the Dharug Aboriginal language of the Sydney region.

Woomeras (commonly called spear throwers), have a handle at one end and a peg at the other, for holding the spear. Woomeras act as an extension of the throwers arm, increasing the speed and distance the spear travels. They vary in style, depending on local traditions, wood availability and the type of spear used. In arid areas woomeras were multipurpose tools, used as a shield or dish, or fitted with a specific stone tool, called an adze, which is used in wood carving and in butchering of game. Others have distinctive carved designs.

These woomera were made at Yirrkala Mission, in the Northern Territory. These objects are part of a large collection of over 460 objects acquired via purchase from Reverend Wilbur Selwyn Chaseling in 1940. Chaseling was the first Reverend at the Yirrkala Mission, which was established in 1935. Yirrkala Mission was the last mission to be established in eastern Arnhem Land.

State/Province Northern Territory
Northern Territory
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number EH810
Classification CH classification PHOTOGRAPHS Group
CH classification INDIGENOUS CULTURES
CH classification ARMS & ARMOUR WEAPONS
Name or Title Photograph
Production Place Bellenden Ker/North/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1890-1899
History and Use

The people in this photograph are the Malanbarra Yidinji people whose country extended from the tablelands around the Mt Bellenden Ker area. The shields they carry are called Begon. The shield third from left is the ‘butterfly’ design, fourth from left is the larvae stage of a local grub and the shield held by the children at the front is a pond skater design.

Rainforest people are best known for their shields and swords, which distinguish them from all other Indigenous language groups. Their swords were often the same height as the men, and required great strength and skill to wield them effectively. The swords were traditionally made from hardwood, not generally decorated, and were used in combat up until the last remaining people were relocated to the Mona Mona, Yarrabah and Palm Island missions in the 1930s. The shields were cut from the buttress roots of native fig trees that, being soft, were easily carved into an asymmetric shape. After shaping the shields, the men would paint them with rich ochre colours using abstract designs that represented both animal and plant totems of importance.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

State/Province Queensland
Queensland
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number QE14592
Name or Title Boomerang.
Production Place South East/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 19th Century
History and Use

The boomerang has played an important role in Australian Aboriginal cultures for hunting and sport. A boomerang is useful for hunting larger animals, fish and birds. As a spinning stick, it covers a greater area than a directly thrown spear. There are many different kinds of boomerang; some are evenly curved, while others have a hook or flat club at one end. This one, from Moreton Island, is in the classic ‘returning’ design.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

State/Province Queensland
Queensland
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number QE26902
Classification CH classification INDIGENOUS CULTURES Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander spear
Name or Title Spear
Production Place Thornlands/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 2018
History and Use

This spear is one of a group of objects acquired from Aboriginal/South Sea Islander Artist, Mr Aubrey Jack (John) Wimbus.
Through his artworks, Wimbus pays homage to his childhood and connection to land. He reflects and references his cultural knowledge passed down to him by his grandfather Jack Wimbus, a Bunda man. His collecting knowledge and inclusion of natural materials in his art making processes, including rocks and timbers collected from river areas, draws heavily on passed down cultural knowledge. Created in 2018, this spear reflects the artist’s Aboriginal and South Sea Islander heritage through his use of vibrant colourways and dot patterns.

State/Province Queensland
Queensland
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number QE26901
Classification CH classification INDIGENOUS CULTURES Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander spear
Name or Title Spear
Production Place Thornlands/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 2018
History and Use

This spear is one of a group of objects acquired from Aboriginal/South Sea Islander Artist, Mr Aubrey Jack (John) Wimbus.
Through his artworks, Wimbus pays homage to his childhood and connection to land. He reflects and references his cultural knowledge passed down to him by his grandfather Jack Wimbus, a Bunda man. His collecting knowledge and inclusion of natural materials in his art making processes, including rocks and timbers collected from river areas, draws heavily on passed down cultural knowledge. Created in 2018, this spear reflects the artist’s Aboriginal and South Sea Islander heritage through his use of vibrant colourways and dot patterns.

State/Province Queensland
Queensland
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number QE11792
Classification CH classification INDIGENOUS CULTURES Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Food & Drink Consumption Crockery
Name or Title Pot.
Production Place Yarrabah/North East/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1995-1996
History and Use

Edward Deemera, the maker of this ceramic pot, is a Gunggandji man who was born and raised in the Yarrabah community. He worked at the pottery studio in 1972 as an apprentice learning to mix and recycle clay. He gradually became familiar with the process of working in and maintaining a pottery work shop. Beginning with hand built individual pieces, he moved onto the pottery wheel where he mastered the art of production line work, turning out functional ware i.e. mugs, bowls wine goblets and plates for retail outlets. Deemera has participated in exhibitions and workshops and continues to practice as a professional potter at the Yarrabah Guyala Pottery studio.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

State/Province Queensland
Queensland
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number QE2629
Name or Title Breastplate
Production Place Australia
Production Date Circa 1847
History and Use

This breastplate was awarded to Poonipun, an Aboriginal man from Stradbroke Island. Poonipun was among a group of Aboriginal men who rescued passengers and crew from a cargo vessel, the Sovereign, when it was wrecked at the south end of Moreton Island in 1847. Each man was awarded a breastplate in recognition of his heroic rescue efforts. This breastplate is one of only three known to survive from the Sovereign incident.

Breastplates such as this which were rewards for service and merit or for acts of bravery and heroism are a source of pride and honour for Aboriginal people. However, Aboriginal breastplates are complex and sometimes controversial objects.

For many Aboriginal people breastplates are a reminder of land dispossession, cultural dislocation, and mistreatment of ancestors. To others, breastplates are trophies of Aboriginal resistance, humanity, and survival. Regardless of these different views, breastplates are an important part of history and symbols of Aboriginal survival.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

State/Province Queensland
Queensland
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number E21410.6
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Food & Drink Consumption Crockery tea cup
Name or Title Cup
Production Place Leura/Blue Mountains/New South Wales/Australia
Production Date 1953-1957
History and Use

This object is from the Glenn Cooke collection of Aboriginal-themed design. In 1999 Glenn Cooke donated his collection of over 1300 domestic and souvenir wares to Queensland Museum. Together the collection provides detailed examples of how Aboriginal art and design have been adopted and reproduced in Australian popular culture. The Glenn Cooke collection dates from the 1940s, when Aboriginal design was first embraced by ‘Australiana’ industries, up until the present day. While some of the objects in the collection were made by Indigenous people, the vast majority were not. These items therefore raise a number of questions about authorship, authenticity and appropriation in Indigenous-themed design in Australia.

This teaset was produced by the Essexware pottery studio. The Essexware studio was established at Leura in the Blue Mountains, NSW and was active from 1951-1957.

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Registration Number E21410.9
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Food & Drink Consumption Crockery saucer
Name or Title Saucer
Production Place Leura/Blue Mountains/New South Wales/Australia
Production Date 1953-1957
History and Use

This object is from the Glenn Cooke collection of Aboriginal-themed design. In 1999 Glenn Cooke donated his collection of over 1300 domestic and souvenir wares to Queensland Museum. Together the collection provides detailed examples of how Aboriginal art and design have been adopted and reproduced in Australian popular culture. The Glenn Cooke collection dates from the 1940s, when Aboriginal design was first embraced by ‘Australiana’ industries, up until the present day. While some of the objects in the collection were made by Indigenous people, the vast majority were not. These items therefore raise a number of questions about authorship, authenticity and appropriation in Indigenous-themed design in Australia.

This teaset was produced by the Essexware pottery studio. The Essexware studio was established at Leura in the Blue Mountains, NSW and was active from 1951-1957.

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Registration Number E21410.4
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Food & Drink Consumption Crockery tea cup
Name or Title Cup
Production Place Leura/Blue Mountains/New South Wales/Australia
Production Date 1953-1957
History and Use

This object is from the Glenn Cooke collection of Aboriginal-themed design. In 1999 Glenn Cooke donated his collection of over 1300 domestic and souvenir wares to Queensland Museum. Together the collection provides detailed examples of how Aboriginal art and design have been adopted and reproduced in Australian popular culture. The Glenn Cooke collection dates from the 1940s, when Aboriginal design was first embraced by ‘Australiana’ industries, up until the present day. While some of the objects in the collection were made by Indigenous people, the vast majority were not. These items therefore raise a number of questions about authorship, authenticity and appropriation in Indigenous-themed design in Australia.

This teaset was produced by the Essexware pottery studio. The Essexware studio was established at Leura in the Blue Mountains, NSW and was active from 1951-1957.

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Registration Number E21410.2
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Food & Drink Consumption Crockery tea cup
Name or Title Cup
Production Place Leura/Blue Mountains/New South Wales/Australia
Production Date 1953-1957
History and Use

This object is from the Glenn Cooke collection of Aboriginal-themed design. In 1999 Glenn Cooke donated his collection of over 1300 domestic and souvenir wares to Queensland Museum. Together the collection provides detailed examples of how Aboriginal art and design have been adopted and reproduced in Australian popular culture. The Glenn Cooke collection dates from the 1940s, when Aboriginal design was first embraced by ‘Australiana’ industries, up until the present day. While some of the objects in the collection were made by Indigenous people, the vast majority were not. These items therefore raise a number of questions about authorship, authenticity and appropriation in Indigenous-themed design in Australia.

This teaset was produced by the Essexware pottery studio. The Essexware studio was established at Leura in the Blue Mountains, NSW and was active from 1951-1957.

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Registration Number E21410.12
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Food & Drink Consumption Crockery saucer
Name or Title Saucer
Production Place Leura/Blue Mountains/New South Wales/Australia
Production Date 1953-1957
History and Use

This object is from the Glenn Cooke collection of Aboriginal-themed design. In 1999 Glenn Cooke donated his collection of over 1300 domestic and souvenir wares to Queensland Museum. Together the collection provides detailed examples of how Aboriginal art and design have been adopted and reproduced in Australian popular culture. The Glenn Cooke collection dates from the 1940s, when Aboriginal design was first embraced by ‘Australiana’ industries, up until the present day. While some of the objects in the collection were made by Indigenous people, the vast majority were not. These items therefore raise a number of questions about authorship, authenticity and appropriation in Indigenous-themed design in Australia.

This teaset was produced by the Essexware pottery studio. The Essexware studio was established at Leura in the Blue Mountains, NSW and was active from 1951-1957.

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Registration Number E21410.10
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Food & Drink Consumption Crockery saucer
Name or Title Saucer
Production Place Leura/Blue Mountains/New South Wales/Australia
Production Date 1953-1957
History and Use

This object is from the Glenn Cooke collection of Aboriginal-themed design. In 1999 Glenn Cooke donated his collection of over 1300 domestic and souvenir wares to Queensland Museum. Together the collection provides detailed examples of how Aboriginal art and design have been adopted and reproduced in Australian popular culture. The Glenn Cooke collection dates from the 1940s, when Aboriginal design was first embraced by ‘Australiana’ industries, up until the present day. While some of the objects in the collection were made by Indigenous people, the vast majority were not. These items therefore raise a number of questions about authorship, authenticity and appropriation in Indigenous-themed design in Australia.

This teaset was produced by the Essexware pottery studio. The Essexware studio was established at Leura in the Blue Mountains, NSW and was active from 1951-1957.

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