Object Advanced Search : Clothing and Textiles

Results 1 to 25 of 30

Page 1 of 2

Click for Details
Registration Number H24089
Classification CH classification COSTUME Headwear woman
Name or Title Hat (Girls)
History and Use

This girl’s bonnet came from a clothing and millinery store called 'Jeanette Salon' in Warwick. Milliners and tailors were important tradespeople in country Queensland, providing access to the latest styles and materials for rural and remote communities. Women would often travel great distances for a fitting, particularly if there was an upcoming occasion such as a wedding or christening.

Queensland Museum has an extensive collection of hats and bonnets which speak of a time when hats were an essential part of everyone’s wardrobe.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H27530
Classification CH classification COSTUME Headwear woman
Name or Title Boater Hat
Production Place Brisbane/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1950-1959
History and Use

This hat was designed in the 1950s and is believed to have been worn to a Government House cocktail party. Patrick Ogilvie, the designer, fashioned hats for women all over Queensland for fifty years. Ogilvie hats incorporated international fashion trends but more importantly, they matched the personalities of their wearers and each hat was a one-off.

Ogilvie began his working life as an accountant but at 21 he trained and worked in millinery in Sydney before returning to Brisbane to begin his business in 1947. From 1948 he was based at Elizabeth St, in fashionable Rowe’s Arcade. In the seventies, hats became less fashionable and were no longer considered an essential part of a woman’s outfit. Ogilvie was forced to close the Rowe’s Arcade premises in 1972 and move to Indooroopilly.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H42359
Classification CH classification COSTUME Beachwear man
Name or Title Swimsuit
Production Place Australia
Production Date 1928-1948
History and Use

This is a man’s bathing costume of the style made between the 1920s and 1940s. It is a one piece costume with a full skirt in navy woollen jersey fabric. These swimsuits were designed to combine modesty with mobility, however they were very heavy when wet. The suit was made in Australia by Jantzen, an American swimwear company that has operated since 1910 producing both fashion and athletic swimming costumes.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H42697.1
Classification CH classification COSTUME Beachwear woman
Name or Title Bikini Top
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1963-1968
History and Use

This 1960s bikini was designed by Paula Stafford who was a leading Australian swimsuit designer from the 1950s through to the 1980s. It is made of navy and white cotton and is reversible – a design feature for which Stafford bikinis were well known. Born in Victoria, Stafford moved to Queensland in the 1940s, living first in Toowoomba and later in Surfers Paradise. As the Gold Coast became an increasingly popular tourist destination, Stafford’s hobby of making bikinis for friends became a full time business. By the mid-50s, Stafford had a Cavill Avenue swimwear boutique and organised Australia’s first bikini parade to help promote the Gold Coast. Her designs were soon in demand throughout Australia and overseas.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H22183
Classification CH classification COSTUME Daywear man
Name or Title Board Shorts - Male
Production Place New South Wales/Australia
Production Date 1980-2000
History and Use

These board shorts are designed by the Australian surf wear company Mambo. Established in 1984, Mambo Graphics gained a reputation for colourful and irreverent artwork, depicting religious, political and humorous themes. Mambo progressed from a small screen-printing concern to an internationally successful design brand. The Mambo company structure and product range has changed as it has expanded, however it retains links to its origins by mentoring emerging artists and supporting environmental causes. These board shorts feature a late 1980s design which places religious icons in a lurid, ‘fluoro’ colour scheme typical of surf clothing at this time.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H23862.1
Classification CH classification COSTUME Footwear woman
CH classification COSTUME ACCESSORIES Female bag
Name or Title Cloth Bag for Ladies Leather Boots
Production Place Queensland/Australia
History and Use

This cloth bag held a pair of ladies leather boots made in Queensland by boot maker A. Munro. This style of mid-calf, heeled boot has been popular intermittently since the late 19th century and could be worn as a riding boot or fashion item. The handmade bag is cotton and dyed in a bright floral design. The boots and bag are part of a large collection of objects donated to the Queensland Museum by the Marks family of Brisbane. The bag was made by Dr E. N. Marks’ mother who maintained a tradition of making bags to protect household objects. Using the mother’s maiden name, the bags were known in the family as Drury Bags.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H42023
Classification CH classification COSTUME Eveningwear woman
Name or Title Ball Gown
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1890-1894
History and Use

This dress was designed and made by Mrs. Janet Walker, (1850 - 1940), Brisbane's leading 19th-century costumier, for Mrs Barbara Jane Drury, nee Grahame (1846 - 1907), grandmother of the donor and wife of Edward Robert Drury, Manager of the Queensland National Bank. It may have been worn to the Vice Regal Ball held at Government House in July 1892.

More information regarding Janet Walker can be found in the “Find out about” section on Histories of Queensland.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H42037
Classification CH classification COSTUME Beachwear woman
Name or Title Swimsuit
Production Place Austria
Production Date 1980-1989
History and Use

This 1980s ‘Calypso’ woman’s swimsuit was made in Australia and designed by Triumph, an international swimwear and underwear manufacturer founded in Germany in 1886. This garment shows several design features characteristic of 1980s swimwear including the v-neck, low-cut back and gathered stitching. Like this suit, most women’s swimwear in the 1980s was made of lightweight, tight-fitting and fast drying synthetic fabrics like nylon and elastane (lycra).

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H42340
Classification CH classification COSTUME Headwear infant
CH classification HANDCRAFTS Lace tatted lace
Name or Title Baby's Bonnet
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1985-1989
History and Use

This baby’s bonnet was made by Brisbane-born Elsie May Hicks. It is a form of tatting - a lace-making technique dating to the early 19th century where the lace is formed by a pattern of chains and rings double stitched over a core thread. Gaps, called picots, give this lace its form and decorative effect.

Elsie May Whear learnt needlework from her mother, including tatting, but taught herself to crochet. At 12years old, she left school to work in millinery and then for Jenyns corsetry manufacturers, Brisbane. In 1918 she married William Hicks and they had two children. Elsie began exhibiting pen paintings in the 1930s and used the name Mrs W. (William) Hicks, even after her husband died (in 1968). During the 1970s and 1980s she exhibited soft toys and crochet – mostly at the Pine Rivers Show. Queensland Museum has a collection of Elsie Hicks’ work which contributes to a broader collection of prize-winning lacework and embroidery from around the state.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H225.3
Classification CH classification COSTUME Daywear woman
Name or Title "Poke" Bonnet
Production Date 1840s-1850s
History and Use

This Victorian Quaker's poke bonnet was worn by Mrs Sarah Benson Walker (1812-1893) in the 1850s in Hobart. Quakers, also known as the Society of Friends, are practising Christians who believe in an inward focus for spirituality, and therefore an outward practice of simplicity in all things, including dress. In the 19th century, Quaker women wore bonnets like these both indoors and out. This particular style of bonnet dates to the 1830s and 1840s and was worn with a dress and shawl, also held at Queensland Museum.

The majority of Quaker settlers arrived in Queensland in the 1860s, and one of the largest meeting houses in Australia is currently located in Brisbane.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H42749
Classification CH classification TEXTILES Bedding bedspread
Name or Title Bedspread - Embroidered
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1915-1919
History and Use

This trousseau bedspread was made by a Kangaroo Point resident in the 1920s. Trousseau is a French word that refers to a collection of clothing and bedding a bride would assemble before her wedding. A typical trousseau would include clothes, table, bed and bath linens.

Used by several generations of the maker’s family throughout Queensland, particularly in the tropics, the bedspread is a typical representation of homemade linen of the period just preceding the Great Depression.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H48180.1
Classification CH classification COSTUME Wedding woman
CH classification COSTUME ACCESSORIES Hat Accessories bonnet veil
Name or Title Wedding Dress
Production Place Brisbane/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1964
History and Use

This white silk shantung wedding dress was designed by Gwen Gillam in 1964 for Mrs Rita Dunstone (nee McCamley) from Rockampton. Gwen also designed the bridesmaid's dresses and the outfit worn by Mrs McCamley the mother of the bride.

Gwen Gillam was one of Queensland’s leading dress designers of the 20th century, reaching the peak of her career in the 1950s-1970s. Not only a skilled designer, she offered her clients a ‘whole look’, which included elegant accessories imported especially by her salon.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H48186.1
Classification CH classification COSTUME Eveningwear woman
Name or Title Going Away Dress
Production Place Brisbane/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1961
  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H23326
Classification CH classification COSTUME Headwear woman
Name or Title Hat
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1950s-1960s
History and Use

This hat was designed by Patrick Ogilvie, who fashioned hats for women all over Queensland for fifty years. Ogilvie began his working life as an accountant but at 21 he trained and worked in millinery in Sydney before returning to Brisbane to begin his business in 1947. From 1948 he was based in fashionable Rowe’s Arcade, Elizabeth St.

In the seventies, hats became less fashionable and were no longer considered an essential part of one’s outfit. Ogilvie was forced to close the Rowe’s Arcade premises in 1972 and move to Indooroopilly. Ogilvie hats incorporated international fashion trends but more importantly, they matched the personalities of their wearers and each hat was a one-off.

Queensland Museum has a collection of approximately thirty-six Patrick Ogilvie pieces which span the height of his career and display his diverse style and approach to millinery.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H42697.2
Classification CH classification COSTUME Beachwear woman
Name or Title Bikini Bottom
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1963-1968
History and Use

This 1960s bikini was designed by Paula Stafford who was a leading Australian swimsuit designer from the 1950s through to the 1980s. It is made of navy and white cotton and is reversible – a design feature for which Stafford bikinis were well known. Born in Victoria, Stafford moved to Queensland in the 1940s, living first in Toowoomba and later in Surfers Paradise. As the Gold Coast became an increasingly popular tourist destination, Stafford’s hobby of making bikinis for friends became a full time business. By the mid-50s, Stafford had a Cavill Avenue swimwear boutique and organised Australia’s first bikini parade to help promote the Gold Coast. Her designs were soon in demand throughout Australia and overseas.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H2754
Classification CH classification COSTUME Wedding woman
Name or Title Wedding Dress
Production Place London/England
Production Date 1894-1895
History and Use

The two-piece wedding dress, made by a Mrs W.T. Nassau on 48 & 50 Annerley Road, Crystal Palace S.E. London, c. 1894, comprises of a bodice with high neck collar, long sleeves with large puffy shoulders embellished with lace around the chest and sleeve cuffs; and a trained skirt made of cream silk brocade, featuring sprigs of flowers, embellished with lace and clusters of orange blossoms down the side back. Orange blossoms have traditionally been worn by brides throughout the Victorian period in Europe as the flower symbolised purity, chastity, innocence and fertility. It was common for orange blossoms to be adorned in bridal wreaths, headdress’, bouquets and sometimes pinned to bridal gowns such is the case with this garment.

The wedding dress was made for the donor's grandmother, Henrietta Sara Cooper Tinsley in Liverpool, England when she married Mr William Houlding on 8th April 1895. William was the son of John Houlding, founder of the Everton and Liverpool Football Clubs, owner of Houldings Brewery and for a short while, Lord Mayor of Liverpool in 1897-1898. William Houlding became Chairman of Liverpool Football Club from 1896-1904. Henrietta Sara Houlding then acted as Lady Mayoress during this time.

Lavinia Napier, the grand-daughter of Henrietta, later wore the dress on 4th January 1947, when she married Polish army officer, Mr Cyril Czarkowski-Golejewski in St Peter's Church, Peebles, Scotland. The donor and her husband later emigrated to Kenya in 1948 and then to Emerald, Queensland in 1957. The couple had three children and the family grazed sheep and cattle. The wedding dress was brought to Queensland in 1957 by Lavinia Napier and donated to the Queensland Museum in the early 2000's.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H27532
Classification CH classification COSTUME Headwear woman
Name or Title Floral Toque
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1966
History and Use

This hat was designed for former Lord Mayor of Brisbane, Sally-Anne Atkinson, for the christening of her baby son, Mark, in 1966. Atkinson became Lord Mayor in 1985 and occupied the office until 1991. She has given several of her outfits, worn at important times in her life and career, to the Queensland Museum.

The designer of this hat was Patrick Ogilvie, who fashioned hats for women all over Queensland for fifty years. Ogilvie hats incorporated international fashion trends but more importantly, they matched the personalities of their wearers and each hat was a one-off.

Ogilvie began his working life as an accountant but at 21 he trained and worked in millinery in Sydney before returning to Brisbane to begin his business in 1947. From 1948 he was based at Elizabeth St, in fashionable Rowe’s Arcade. In the seventies, hats became less fashionable and were no longer considered an essential part of a woman’s outfit. Ogilvie was forced to close the Rowe’s Arcade premises in 1972, and move to Indooroopilly.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H27542
Classification CH classification COSTUME Headwear woman
Name or Title Turban
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1960-1969
History and Use

The designer of this hat was Patrick Ogilvie, who fashioned hats for women all over Queensland for fifty years. Ogilvie hats incorporated international fashion trends but more importantly, they matched the personalities of their wearers and each hat was a one-off.

Ogilvie began his working life as an accountant but at 21 he trained and worked in millinery in Sydney before returning to Brisbane to begin his business in 1947. From 1948 he was based at Elizabeth St, in fashionable Rowe’s Arcade.In the seventies, hats became less fashionable and were no longer considered an essential part of a woman’s outfit. Ogilvie was forced to close the Rowe’s Arcade premises in 1972, and move to Indooroopilly.

Queensland Museum has a collection of approximately thirty-six Patrick Ogilvie pieces which span the height of his career and display his diverse style and approach to millinery.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H47991
Classification CH classification COSTUME Headwear man
Name or Title Hat - Bicorne with black plummage
History and Use

The Sir Samuel Griffith collection consists of clothing and accessories which were worn by Sir Samuel Griffith when he was undertaking specific duties in his professional life.
Sir Samuel Griffith (1845-1920) held numerous positions including Attorney General, Premier in 1883 and 1890, Chief Justice of Queensland, Lieutenant Governor of Queensland, and Chief Justice of Australia. Griffith's illustrious career in the law and in Queensland politics culminated in his role in Federation. Following the drafting of the federal constitution during the latter part of the 1890s, and the proclamation of Federation in January 1901, Sir Samuel was appointed Chief Justice of Australia in 1903.
During his appointment as Acting Governor and Lieutenant Governor, from 1899 to 1903, Griffith was required to wear a civil uniform, second class, consisting of a single breasted levee coat and a long pair of trousers. Depending on the occasion, one of a variety of bicorne hats, including this one, were worn with this uniform.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H47992
Classification CH classification COSTUME Headwear man
Name or Title Hat - Bicorne with silver chain
History and Use

The Sir Samuel Griffith collection consists of clothing and accessories which were worn by Sir Samuel Griffith when he was undertaking specific duties in his professional life.
Sir Samuel Griffith (1845-1920) held numerous positions including Attorney General, Premier in 1883 and 1890, Chief Justice of Queensland, Lieutenant Governor of Queensland, and Chief Justice of Australia. Griffith's illustrious career in the law and in Queensland politics culminated in his role in Federation. Following the drafting of the federal constitution during the latter part of the 1890s, and the proclamation of Federation in January 1901, Sir Samuel was appointed Chief Justice of Australia in 1903.
During his appointment as Acting Governor and Lieutenant Governor, from 1899 to 1903, Griffith was required to wear a civil uniform, second class, consisting of a single breasted levee coat and a long pair of trousers. Depending on the occasion, one of a variety of bicorne hats, including this one, were worn with this uniform.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H47993
Classification CH classification COSTUME Headwear man
Name or Title Hat - Bicorne with black braid
History and Use

The Sir Samuel Griffith collection consists of clothing and accessories which were worn by Sir Samuel Griffith when he was undertaking specific duties in his professional life.
Sir Samuel Griffith (1845-1920) held numerous positions including Attorney General, Premier in 1883 and 1890, Chief Justice of Queensland, Lieutenant Governor of Queensland, and Chief Justice of Australia.
Griffith's illustrious career in the law and in Queensland politics culminated in his role in Federation. Following the drafting of the federal constitution during the latter part of the 1890s, and the proclamation of Federation in January 1901, Sir Samuel was appointed Chief Justice of Australia in 1903.
During his appointment as Acting Governor and Lieutenant Governor, from 1899 to 1903, Griffith was required to wear a civil uniform, second class, consisting of a single breasted levee coat and a long pair of trousers. Depending on the occasion, one of a variety of bicorne hats, including this one, were worn with this uniform.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H27028
Classification CH classification TEXTILES Table Linen dressing table cloth
Name or Title Table Runner, Souvenir World War 1
Production Place Egypt
Production Date 1915
History and Use

This silk fringed cloth with embroidered flowers, flags, leaves and scene of the Sphinx and pyramids is a souvenir from World War 1.Souvenirs like this were produced in Egypt and England, often for the Australian soldier market. The troops bought the souvenirs and sent them home to their families, who often framed them or made them into cushion covers and other items. Some items were also exported to Australia and New Zealand and sold there. The inscriptions on this item read: "Souvenir of Egypt 1915. To Ada from Ian Egypt. Cairo." Sadly, the identities of Ada and Ian are not known. They may have been brother and sister, or sweethearts.

Country Egypt
Egypt
  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H43796
Classification CH classification DOCUMENTS Maps military map
CH classification COSTUME Headwear unisex
CH classification CIVIC MEMENTOES Souvenirs
Name or Title Scarf - Gallipoli Map
Production Date 1915-1920
History and Use

World War 1 souvenirs like this printed cotton scarf were produced in Egypt and England, often for the Australian soldier market. The troops bought the souvenirs and sent them home to their families, who often framed them or made them into cushion covers and other items. Some items were also exported to Australia and New Zealand and sold there. Depictions of the Gallipoli landing were popular subjects for the souvenirs.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H25265
Classification CH classification COSTUME Underwear woman
Name or Title Corset, Woman's
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1912-1932
History and Use

This corset comes from the House of Jenyns, established in Queensland by husband and wife Ebenezer and Sarah Jenyns. Formerly surgical instrument makers, Sarah and Ebenezer began making corsets at a time when they were being repurposed as hygienic, offering health benefits to their wearers. The partnership did not last and Sarah herself became the brains behind the Jenyns Patent Corset, which was designed to alleviate the backache, poor posture and other negative impacts of traditional corsets.

Under Sarah’s direction, Jenyns sold patent rights to manufacture and sell the corsets all over the world.

In the 1950s the business passed to the second generation and expanded into maternity wear and high fashion foundation garments. By 1964 the company had more than 500 employees. In the 1990s, after nearly a century, one of Queensland’s most successful clothing companies ceased operating and today Jenyns corsets are no longer made.

This particular corset is Model 55W and is based on a 1910 patent. It was manufactured in England.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H25266
Classification CH classification COSTUME Underwear woman
Name or Title Corset, Woman's
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1912-1932
History and Use

This corset comes from the House of Jenyns, established in Queensland by husband and wife Ebenezer and Sarah Jenyns. Formerly surgical instrument makers, Sarah and Ebenezer began making corsets at a time when they were being repurposed as hygienic, offering health benefits to their wearers. The partnership did not last and Sarah herself became the brains behind the Jenyns Patent Corset, which was designed to alleviate the backache, poor posture and other negative impacts of traditional corsets.

Under Sarah’s direction, Jenyns sold patent rights to manufacture and sell the corsets all over the world.

In the 1950s the business passed to the second generation and expanded into maternity wear and high fashion foundation garments. By 1964 the company had more than 500 employees. In the 1990s, after nearly a century, one of Queensland’s most successful clothing companies ceased operating and today Jenyns corsets are no longer made.

This particular corset is based on a 1922 patent and was made at the company’s factory in Melbourne St, South Brisbane.

  • Top
  • Shortlist Functions
  • 0 results in shortlist


About the database

The Queensland Museum collection Online is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added regularly.


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about an object or specimen, please email:
qm.vernon@qm.qld.gov.au

Page 1 of 2