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Registration Number H838.1
Classification CH classification PHOTOGRAPHY Cameras Cine cinematographe
Name or Title Lumiere Movie Camera and Projector - film cassette
Production Place Paris/Ile-de-France/France
Production Date Circa 1898
History and Use

The Lumiere Cinematographe, invented in France in1894, was a portable projector, camera, and film processor in one. It was invented by Auguste and Louis Lumiere - brothers, whose designs strongly shaped the future and popularity of modern cinema.

This film cassette was used to store film safely away from exposure to light.

There are only 12 known examples of the Cinematographe in the world today. Three are in Australia, of which this is the only one still in operating condition. It was acquired by the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Stock in 1899 and was used by the Department's artist and photographer Frederick Charles Wills and his assistant Henry William Mobsby. Together they comprised the worlds first government-funded film unit.

Footage filmed by this Cinematographe and possibly stored in this cassette includes scenes of the opening of Queensland parliament, sugar mills in Nambour, and Boer War soldiers marching on Queen Street, Brisbane. The 43 surviving reels of film Wills and Mobsby took comprise the largest collection of Australian film still in existence.

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Registration Number H47742
Classification CH classification MARITIME TECHNOLOGY Diving Diver's helmet
Name or Title Diving Helmet
Production Place London/England
Production Date 1840-1844
History and Use

This helmet may be the second oldest known to exist. It was used in the excavation of the ship 'Royal George', sunk in 1782 off Portsmouth, England. The design of the helmet and fittings proved to be so reliable that Siebe’s ‘standard diving dress’ became the British Admiralty’s benchmark for all diving equipment. It was hand beaten from a single sheet of copper and apart from the more recent faceplate each component has been stamped with the number ‘1’. This suggests that it was the first helmet to be made in a very limited series. Two other helmets held in private collections in America have the numbers ‘2’ and ‘3’ stamped on their components, making this one of the first of the series.

The copper domed bonnet has been beaten from a single piece of copper. A circular castellation (beaten join) is evident on the crown of the bonnet and castellation lines are also visible on the front centre of the bonnet running from the front port to the crown, and along the shoulders of the corselet.

Positioned at the centre back of the bonnet is an air inlet pipe (without a non-return valve) and a non-adjustable air exhaust valve. Both are offset on an angle. A rudimentary spitcock (outlet tap) is present and positioned between the front and proper right ports (opposite the small eyelet). This has almost certainly been added after the helmet was manufactured and is presumably fashioned from a gas tap or keg spigot.

Two (2) studs are mounted on the front of the corselet for the attachment of weights, along with lanyard hooks, positioned above the neck ring on each side of the bonnet. The lanyards were also used to assist in the rigging of weights. A small brass eyelet is evident between the front and proper left ports.

Twelve (12) threaded bolts are positioned around the outer perimeter of the corselet, however the associated brails and wing nuts are not present. (Brails are metal straps which fit over the bolts, clamping the corselet to the diving suit by way of the nuts to form an airtight seal).

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Registration Number H10912.1
Classification CH classification MACHINERY Engines Steam horizontal mill type
Name or Title Horizontal Mill Type Steam Engine (Cylinder)
Production Place Lincoln/England
Production Date 1905-1924
History and Use

This Ruston Proctor Horizontal Mill Steam Engine is a single cylinder double acting mill engine. It is believed that the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Queensland purchased as a new engine from the manufacturer around 1910. It was acquired for use as a teaching engine.

The engine uses a condensing system to increase the expansion of the steam. A partial vacuum is produced by condensing the steam outside the engine. The steam expands through a greater pressure range and does more work. This engine could have been connected to large factory machines by a belt around the fly wheel and is typical of engines used to drive saw mills.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H19512.1
Classification CH classification PHOTOGRAPHY Projectors Cine projector part
Name or Title Rolling Loop Film Transport Mechanism
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1970
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Registration Number H4.1
Classification CH classification HOROLOGY Clocks wall clock
Name or Title Clock, Thomas Tompion
Production Place England
Production Date 1706
History and Use

This bracket clock was made in 1708 and is number 435 of the Tompion Banger collection. Thomas Tompion (1639-1713) was a renowned English clockmaker, sometimes called ‘the father of English clockmaking’. He was watch and clockmaker to the British monarchs of the day and the first clockmaker to be given the honour of a burial in Westminster Abbey. Tompion partnered with Graham Banger from 1700 to 1708, producing a fine range of individually numbered timepieces.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H3862
Classification CH classification MARITIME TECHNOLOGY Diving Diver's helmet
Name or Title Diving Helmet
Production Place Australia
Production Date Circa 1930
History and Use

During the 1920s and 1930s there were a number of expeditions to the Great Barrier Reef by amateur and professional scientists. Charles Melbourne ‘Mel’ Ward was a prominent member of many of these expeditions, some of which were carried out in association with the Australian Museum.

This Australian made hood (helmet) was featured in the pearl diving scenes from the 1937 Australian film 'Vengence Of The Deep' (AKA 'Lovers and Luggers'), directed by Ken G. Hall and filmed by Frank Hurley (cinematographer).

Another film crew from Hollywood arrived with the intention of also producing a pearling film. The cinematographer and a colleague did met up with Mel Ward and his shallow diving expedition and the crew and Ward spent a number of months diving for crustaceans off PNG - Ward's speciality. Eventually the footage was scrapped and the crew returned to Hollywood.

Mel Ward was one of the first scientists to experiment with underwater cameras and to use underwater goggles or ‘divers’ glasses’. He was also the subject matter of the first underwater photograph taken on the Great Barrier Reef.

This hood has a large rectangular faceplate. The crown followed the shape of the diver's head, making it easier to tilt the head backwards for an upward view. The inlet valve allowed air to enter the hood on the mid right side and was guided by a deflector to the front window; minimizing fogging and draft. Excess air escaped below the apron (corselet). The position of the air inlet valve forms an air safely chamber; in case of a cut or loosened hose. The hood sat on the diver’s shoulders and was held there by four (4) 8.25 pound lead weights hung on straps from eye hooks on the apron; two (2) on the front and two (2) on the back. The contour roll on the outer edges added strength to the apron. There is a lifting (ducking) handle at the top, and two side handles.

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Registration Number H3892
Classification CH classification MARITIME TECHNOLOGY Diving Diver's helmet
Name or Title Diving Helmet
Production Place Australia
Production Date 1945
History and Use

The Robinson Brothers helmets (manufactured from 1943-1945) were the only Australian made production standard dress diving helmet. Only fifty six (56) Robinson Helmets were made (fifty for the Commonwealth Salvage Board). This helmet was manufactured in 1945 with the serial number forty six (46). The production was subject to a low run, which makes this one of the rarest diving helmets world wide. The unusual clip that tethers the front light (viewing window) is known as a 'monkey puzzle' clip.

Established in 1854, Robinson Bros & Co. Pty Ltd manufacturing engineers, brass founders and coppersmiths manufactured machinery used in the food industry in Melbourne. Founded by James McFarlane Robinson and his brothers in 1854 the firm steadily expanded from plumbering and copper smithing into general engineering. As one of Melbourne's most important engineering companies Robinson Bros constructed railway bridges, gold mining equipment, abattoir machinery and many other diverse pieces of equipment (including the first turnstiles at the Melbourne Cricket Ground). The company crashed with the collapse of the land boom and was reconstructed in 1888-94 on a reduced scale. Alfred Deakin was Chairman of Directors during this period. In 1935, Robinson Bros (in liquidation) was purchased by Valentine Henderson of Henderson's Federal Spring Works and operated as Robinson Bros and Co (1935) Pty Ltd until if finally closed in 1973.

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Registration Number H3881
Classification CH classification MARITIME TECHNOLOGY Diving Diver's helmet
Name or Title Diving Helmet
Production Place England
Production Date Circa 1957
History and Use

This helmet is particularly unusual. There is a single large fixed front light (window), no conventional air inlet and no corselet. This helmet does not appear to be a conventional divers helmet but a very special Mine Recovery Suit (MRS) bonnet. It has a genuine manufacturer's plaque.

This MRS bonnet was built by C. E. Heinke & Co. Ltd under commission from the Royal Navy in 1957 to replace the original MROs used during WWII. Only 18 were produced (Connell 2007). Its operation had a maximum depth of one hundred and twenty (120) feet (37 metres).

These types of helmets were originally designed in WWII to recover and de-activate German mines.

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Registration Number H12391.1
Classification CH classification MACHINERY Engines Steam single cylinder
Name or Title Ransomes Sims & Jefferies Single Cylinder 6 N.H.P. Portable Steam Engine
Production Place United Kingdom
Production Date 1919
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Registration Number H31240
Classification CH classification LIGHTING Electric lamp
CH classification METALCRAFT Bronze
Name or Title Bronze Lamp
Production Place Germany
Production Date 1945-1950
History and Use

Made by Stanislaw Paczoski while he and his wife Anna lived in a Displaced Persons Camp in Germany after WWII, this lamp is an example of human creativity and ingenuity in the most difficult of circumstances. It also gives insight into the lives of those that emigrated and chose to settle in Queensland, bringing with them a variety of skills and experiences.

Stanislaw and his wife Anna were refugees from Poland who spent five years in the camp near the Dutch border before emigrating to Australia. Stanislaw was very talented with his hands and made the lamp to escape boredom. He found the bronze sheeting in the forest around the camp and made the lamp with simple, non-specialised tools such as scissors. The animal motifs on the lamps were inspired by German church decoration

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

State/Province Queensland
Queensland
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number H2214
Classification CH classification SCIENCES
Name or Title Electrophoretic Apparatus
Production Place Australia
Production Date 1950
History and Use

This electrophoretic apparatus was built and used at the Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service 1950. The tray was filled with a liquid chlorobenzene solution. The blood sample to be analysed was smeared across a small paper strip and placed in the liquid, where an electric current was applied. When the particles on the strip were charged, they moved to leave a distinctive pattern that, with the help of an electrophoretic scanner, allowed scientists to analyse serum proteins and see if the proteins had a positive or negative charge.

This electrophoresis device and accompanying scanner were restored by J.E O’Hagan in May 1967.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H23494.5
Classification CH classification PHOTOGRAPHY Cameras Still pickard
Name or Title View Camera
Production Place England
Production Date 1870-1910
History and Use

Thornton and Pickard were a Manchester based company that initially focussed on shutter production and then moved into making quality cameras. The ‘Imperial Perfecta’ camera was one of their field cameras. It had an improved ‘triple extension’ on previous models that had been created at the turn of the century and was produced from1907 to 1908, and then followed by more updated models.
This camera belonged to Mr Owen Cook, who purchased it from Mr E. E. Farmer from Rockhampton in the 1930s. At the turn of the century Mr Farmer was an avid photographer in the Rockhampton region, and recorded many community moments in the region with his photographs.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H23657
Classification CH classification MEDICINE Medicine medicine chest
Name or Title Medical Kit
Production Place England
History and Use

This medical kit was made by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This London-based pharmaceutical company, started in 1880, was responsible for many important medical innovations and would later become GlaxoSmithKline, one of the world’s biggest health care concerns.
The leather purse kit contains a hypodermic syringe and needle. It previously came with a collection of ampoules that would have contained medications or serums, possibly in liquid form for injection. These were removed by Queensland Museum staff for Health and Safety reasons.
The kit was made in Britain in the early 20th century. It is part of a large collection of objects donated to the Queensland Museum by the Marks family of Brisbane, who made significant contributions to the fields of science and medicine.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H23659.1
Classification CH classification SCIENCES Demonstration Equipment spinthariscope
Name or Title Spinthariscope
Production Place England
Production Date 1903
History and Use

The spinthariscope was invented by William Crookes in 1903 after he discovered that a zinc sulphide screen scintillated under radioactive emissions. Crookes named his device after the Greek word 'spintharis' meaning 'a spark'.

Considered to be the first radiation counter it detected individual decay events demonstrated through flashes of light. Each flash was produced by an individual alpha particle.

This object was donated by the Marks family. The Marks family was a prominent Brisbane family that made significant contributions to the fields of science and medicine.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H23690
Classification CH classification ARMS & ARMOUR Ordnance shell
Name or Title Artillery Projectile
Production Date 1880-1900
History and Use

The design of the studded projectile dates back to the 1840s, and was used until the end of the 19th century, assisting the shell to engage with the rifling and allowing greater accuracy in firing. This particular projectile is for muzzled loading artillery. Muzzle loading canons or guns are those in which the projectile (bullet, ball or otherwise) is loaded into the front opening of the artillery, rather than the back.

This object is part of the Marks collection, donated to the Queensland Museum by Dr E.N. Marks. The Marks were a prominent Brisbane family who made significant contributions to the fields of science and medicine.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H3871
Classification CH classification MARITIME TECHNOLOGY Diving Diver's helmet
Name or Title Diving Helmet
Production Place Germany
Production Date 1916-1920
History and Use

Manufactured in 1916-1920 this Draeger 3 bolt, 4 light helmet is clearly stamped with the serial numbers 1679 on the neck rings of both the bonnet and the corselet. The front and side lights do not have grill covers but the top light is fitted with metal cross bars.

This helmet has 4 weight rings, two (2) each on the front and back of the corselet.

Like other German helmet producers, Dräger used the French Denayrouze 3 bolt design as a basis for their helmets and then made adjustments. The Draeger company of Lubeck, Germany, commenced operations in 1909 under Heinrich Draeger. They manufactured gas valves, fire fighting equipment, and mine safety devices. In 1912, the company developed a self-contained dive system combining a 'hard hat' style helmet with a backpack containing compressed oxygen.

The company was passed onto Heinrich's sons, Bernhard and Heinrich Jnr. after his death in 1917 and they continued to build the company becoming Germany's leading manufacturer of diving apparatus, winning numerous patents for diving equipment. They were still in business in 2007 producing helmets for the German Navy as well as participating in a lucrative export trade.

The spelling of the company name has changed over time. Older equipment (until the 1930s) used Draeger. After the 1930s the spelling Dräger has been used.

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Registration Number H3866
Classification CH classification MARITIME TECHNOLOGY Diving Diver's helmet
Name or Title Diving Helmet
Production Place China
Production Date Pre 1939
History and Use

This helmet is in the Siebe Gorman standard dress style (Admiralty Pattern). The centre front light (window) does not have a grill cover. There are two (2) side lights (windows) with grill covers. This helmet has four (4) weight lugs, two (2) each on the front and back of the corselet.

Siebe Gorman designed the first successful diving helmet (used in the excavation of the ship 'Royal George' off Portsmouth, England) in c.1840. The Siebe helmet and fittings design proved to be so reliable that Siebe’s ‘standard diving dress’ became the British Admiralty’s benchmark for all diving equipment.

These Chinese helmets were designed for the average sized Asian person, making the helmet (bonnet and corselet) smaller and lighter than the average American or European helmet. China still produces dive helmets similar to this one today.

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Registration Number H3894
Classification CH classification MARITIME TECHNOLOGY Diving Diver's helmet
Name or Title Diving Helmet
Production Place USA
Production Date 1960s
History and Use

The Divex advanced air diving helmet was one of the earliest modern diving helmets. It is constructed of a lightweight and non-conductive fibreglass material which made it suitable for underwater cutting and welding. The helmet was originally developed by George Swindell and manufactured by Advanced Diving Equipment in Gretna, Louisiana, USA. They later merged with Beckman Instrument Company.

The helmet could be used with a corselet or with a neck ring. Using the corselet had two disadvantages; firstly, since the helmet has only one large front glass you would have to turn your whole body to look side ways and secondly, the corselet required and nut key for six sided nuts.

Divex can trace its pedigree back to an iron foundry with engineering works in Aberdeen. This company was owned by Barry, Henry & Cook.

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Registration Number H3895
Classification CH classification MARITIME TECHNOLOGY Diving Diver's helmet
Name or Title Diving Helmet
Production Place Japan
Production Date 1960s
History and Use

This was the first commercial mixed gas helmet ever made. It was manufactured by the Japanese Yokohama Diving Company after 1964 for less cost than American made helmets. This helmet, although very similar to the American made Kirby-Morgan commercial air helmet manufactured 1963-1964, has various improvements. The lights (windows) are made of plexiglass and sealed with ‘O’-rings. The plexiglass eliminated the need for protective grills and thus provided better vision. The air-intake was much quieter, enabling improved communication and preventing hearing damage for the diver.

In the early 1960s Bob Kirby and Bev Morgan teamed up and started producing Kirby Morgan helmets. They got in touch with the Yokohama Diving Helmet Company in Japan and realised that the Japanese could produce their helmet in the same quality for less cost. Thus, a partnership was formed.

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Registration Number H15971
Classification CH classification MEDICINE First Aid
Name or Title Snake Bite Lancet
History and Use

This kit contains a knife, used to cut open a snake bite wound, and potassium permanganate crystals, known as Condy's Crystals, that were rubbed into the wound to absorb the infected blood. It was once believed that cutting open the wound, removing the venom by suction and then applying a tourniquet would be the most effective treatment but it has since been proven that this method has little effect, and can cause more damage and harmful infection than the snake venom.

This type of treatment was popular in the early 20th century and kits like these would be common in travel bags and household first aid. It wasn’t until the 1970s that the current method of pressure/immobilisation was introduced.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H28489.1
Classification CH classification ARMS & ARMOUR Firearms pistol
Name or Title Mauser C96 Pistol - Broomhandle Mauser
Production Place Germany
Production Date 1896-1937
History and Use

This Mauser C96 Automatic Pistol was the property of Hilton Keith Smith, a soldier who died while a prisoner of war of the Japanese during World War II.

Hilton joined the Australian Army in May 1940, and was sent to Singapore. Apparently unimpressed with the security of Singapore, Hilton sent a letter home requesting that his mother take his pistol, dismantle it, bake the pieces into a cake and send it to him. To avoid the notice of the military censors who read all mail, he phrased the request in ways that would be meaningless to anyone outside the family.

Singapore surrendered to the Japanese on February 15th 1942. The mail with Hilton's cake had not arrived at Singapore when it fell, and after many months the package was returned to his family unopened. Hilton served as a P.O.W., labouring on the Burma Railway before being moved to Japan to work in a coal mine. There, along with several other prisoners, he was forced to stand at attention outdoors for 24 hours in the middle of winter because someone in the slave barracks had been smoking without permission. He caught pneumonia and died on 26th February 1943, two weeks after his 26th birthday.

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Registration Number H6013
Classification CH classification COMMUNICATION Telephonic telephone
Name or Title Telephone - Ericsson AC110
Production Place Sweden
Production Date 1892
History and Use

The Ericsson AC110 handset telephones were among the first commonly used table or desk telephones developed by Ericsson, of Sweden. Also called the “Dachshund” or the skeletal handset, this attractive line was produced in 1892 and became a popular addition to the office and home. For the first time, the handset was fully integrated with the telephone instruments, and hung on a cradle for easy use.

Before the handset, a signal trumpet was used for both speaking and listening. Then there came the speaking tube, which was built into the body of the telephone and an earpiece was attached by cord. In the late 1870s the handset was developed with microphone and receiver in one unit. Ericsson produced their first version in the mid 1880s.

This particular phone has come to Queensland Museum from the General Post Office and is thought to have been used by the Post Master General - the person in charge of all national postal and telecommunication services in Australia. The position of P.M.G. was introduced with Federation in 1901.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H46212.2
Classification CH classification SCIENCES Instruments Optical microscope
Name or Title Travelling Microscope Box
Production Date 19th Century
History and Use

This travelling microscope appears to be a botanical or aquatic microscope of the 19th century and is purported to have been given to Charles Ferdinand Marks when he was a child in Ireland in the 1860s. The object is in very good condition and shows very little sign of use.

This object is part of the Marks collection, donated to the Queensland Museum by Dr E.N. Marks. The Marks were a prominent Brisbane family who made significant contributions to the fields of science and medicine.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H45540
Classification CH classification AUDIO-VISUAL TECHNOLOGY Audio Appliances radio receiver
Name or Title Valve Radio Set
Production Place United Kingdom
Production Date 1924-1928
History and Use

This elaborate radio and speaker set has a three-valve configuration. Early valve radios required external headphones or speakers to transmit sound.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H47441.1
Classification CH classification ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY Computers computer
Name or Title Toshiba T1000 Laptop Computer
Production Place Japan
Production Date 1987-1989
History and Use

The T1000 Laptop Computer was released by the Toshiba Corporation in 1987 and is considered to be the world’s first truly mobile laptop computer. The T1000 has gained this title, amongst some debate, due to its size, weight and rechargeable battery.

This particular computer was used by the Queensland Museum from the late 1980s to the early 1990s. It was used throughout the State in supporting community museums and the Small Museum Grants Scheme.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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