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Registration Number H1826
Classification CH classification HANDCRAFTS Carving shell carving
Name or Title Emu Egg, Silver Mounted
Production Date 1884
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Registration Number H47733
Classification CH classification MEDICINE Medicine
Name or Title Glass bottle of dried blood serum
Production Place Cambridge/Cambridgeshire/England
Production Date 02 May 1940
History and Use

This bottle of dried blood serum is thought to be from the first batch of such serum, produced at Cambridge University (1940). The desiccation process was invented to address the chronic need for transportation of blood products during war time. This bottle belonged to a Mr A E Platt who, according to a letter accompanying the donation, was one of the "first human guinea pigs" to receive reconstituted serum. The bottle is part of Queensland Museum's Red Cross collection.

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Registration Number H49389
Classification CH classification CIVIC MEMENTOES Souvenirs Paper weight
Name or Title Commemorative lead ingot
Production Place Mount Isa/West Central/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1958
History and Use

This lead ingot was given to Mr John Mathew, a former Mount Isa Mines surveyor, with his first pay in 1958. Commemorative ingots were issued to all employees until the practice became too expensive to continue.

Mount Isa Mines was established on 19 January 1924 with early production focussed principally on zinc-lead-silver. During the 1930s and 1940s the mine produced copper for a brief period in response to Australia's war needs during World War Two. Parallel production of zinc-lead-silver and copper did not begin until 1953.

The expansion of commodities in the 1950s coincided with post-war immigration, providing jobs for migrants and an opportunity to rebuild their lives. Migrants have left a rich cultural legacy in Mount Isa and in many remote mining towns throughout Australia.

Mount Isa Mines was acquired by Glencore in May 2013 and is still a major employer in the area.

State/Province Queensland
Queensland
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number H48830
Classification CH classification HANDCRAFTS Carving
CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Food and Drink Consumption tray
Name or Title Wooden tray
Production Place Brisbane/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1948-1950
History and Use

This object is from the Helen Barrett collection, which was donated to Queensland Museum in 2014. Miss Helen Barrett worked as a nurse with the Australian Board of Mission in Solomon Islands from 1947 until 1984. Barrett was based at Tasia in Isabel Province, and Maravovo on Guadalcanal before being stationed at the Hospital of the Epiphany at Fauabu, Malaita from 1968 until 1984. In the 1990s, Barrett worked with the Mothers Union in the Torres Strait Islands. Her collection largely comprises of objects that were presented as gifts over the course of her missionary work in Melanesia.

The tray was made in Brisbane at a craft workshop set up to teach new skills to soldiers who had returnd from World War 2.

State/Province Queensland
Queensland
Country Australia
Australia
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Registration Number H48965
Classification CH classification SCIENCES Instruments Weighing balance, beam
Name or Title Brass and Agate Beam Balance
Production Place Birmingham/England
Production Date 1857-1946
History and Use

This beam balance was owned and used by Charles Joseph Pound (b.1866 – d.1946), one of Australia’s earliest scientists to investigate veterinary and medical diseases in Queensland during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

It forms part of a larger collection of instruments relating to Pound’s work in Queensland and reflects the transfer of new scientific knowledge and approaches from London to Queensland. The collection comprises an assortment of medical and veterinary implements such as surgical instruments, thermometers, syringes, needles and cannula and tubing. It also includes scales, beam balances, weight sets and a set of telescoping tubes.

Charles Joseph Pound was born in Harrow, England on 30th May 1866. He studied laboratory technology at King’s College, London and became a microscopist before going on to study vaccine preparation and protective inoculation procedures at the Pasteur Institute.

Pound first came to Australia in 1892, after receiving an invitation to set up a bacteriology laboratory at the University of Sydney. It was shortly after his arrival that Pound realised the laboratory had not yet been established and quickly managed to secure a position of practical bacteriological laboratory assistant for the New South Wales Department of Health.

In December 1893, Pound was appointed Director of the newly established Queensland Stock Institute in Brisbane – the first institute laboratory in Queensland dedicated to investigating disease of any kind in both humans and animals. In September 1894, Pound looked into Redwater Disease (Bovine Babesiosis) also known as Tick Fever in the gulf district – it was the first inoculation study into this disease in Australia. Pound found that Redwater Disease was confined to bovines and the disease was transmitted through the bite of cattle ticks. The following year, Pound trained Queensland stockowners in the technique of collecting blood from recovered bovines, defibrinating it and using this vaccine to inoculate their at-risk cattle.

At the recommendation of Pound in July 1899, the Queensland Government built new research laboratories under the new name of the Bacteriological Institute. Administration for the building was transferred to the Health Section of the Home Secretary’s Department and Pound was appointed Queensland Government Bacteriologist. During this period, Pound’s work focused on human health and he carried out unofficial laboratory diagnoses for medical practitioners. During this period, Pound was the only scientist in the country producing tuberculin and investigating leprosy. In March 1900, Pound made the first diagnosis of the bubonic plague outbreak in Brisbane. He also had a hand in ensuring a safe milk supply by securing legislation that required regular tuberculosis-testing of dairy herds.

While retaining his title as Government Bacteriologist, in 1910 Pound transferred to the newly built Stock Experiment Station at Yeerongpilly. Some of the early work of the Station included conducting research into the eradication of cattle ticks and the diseases caused by them, undertaking post mortems and animal husbandry research studies and experiments. Pound retired on 31 July 1932 at the age of sixty-six years, and the position was abolished on 27 April 1933.

Pound contributed much to the control of both veterinary and medical disease in Queensland during his thirty-nine years of service in the Queensland government, but his outstanding contribution was his protective inoculation and extension work on babesiosis which saved hundreds of thousands of cattle from tick fever. His willingness to educate the public on all manner of scientific topics through his lectures using glass lantern slides is also to his credit; and although this was sometimes considered publicity to gain kudos, it nonetheless served a useful purpose in making knowledge available to a public far less informed public than of today which ingratiated him to a wide range of people.

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Registration Number H48971
Classification CH classification SCIENCES Instruments Weighing weights
Name or Title Boxed Set of Analytical Weights
Production Date 1872-1959
History and Use

This set of analytical weights with a wooden box was owned and used by Charles Joseph Pound (b.1866 – d.1946), one of Australia’s earliest scientists to investigate veterinary and medical diseases in Queensland during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

It forms part of a larger collection of instruments relating to Pound’s work in Queensland and reflects the transfer of new scientific knowledge and approaches from London to Queensland. The collection comprises an assortment of medical and veterinary implements such as surgical instruments, thermometers, syringes, needles and cannula and tubing. It also includes scales, beam balances, weight sets and a set of telescoping tubes.

Charles Joseph Pound was born in Harrow, England on 30th May 1866. He studied laboratory technology at King’s College, London and became a microscopist before going on to study vaccine preparation and protective inoculation procedures at the Pasteur Institute.

Pound first came to Australia in 1892, after receiving an invitation to set up a bacteriology laboratory at the University of Sydney. It was shortly after his arrival that Pound realised the laboratory had not yet been established and quickly managed to secure a position of practical bacteriological laboratory assistant for the New South Wales Department of Health.

In December 1893, Pound was appointed Director of the newly established Queensland Stock Institute in Brisbane – the first institute laboratory in Queensland dedicated to investigating disease of any kind in both humans and animals. In September 1894, Pound looked into Redwater Disease (Bovine Babesiosis) also known as Tick Fever in the gulf district – it was the first inoculation study into this disease in Australia. Pound found that Redwater Disease was confined to bovines and the disease was transmitted through the bite of cattle ticks. The following year, Pound trained Queensland stockowners in the technique of collecting blood from recovered bovines, defibrinating it and using this vaccine to inoculate their at-risk cattle.

At the recommendation of Pound in July 1899, the Queensland Government built new research laboratories under the new name of the Bacteriological Institute. Administration for the building was transferred to the Health Section of the Home Secretary’s Department and Pound was appointed Queensland Government Bacteriologist. During this period, Pound’s work focused on human health and he carried out unofficial laboratory diagnoses for medical practitioners. During this period, Pound was the only scientist in the country producing tuberculin and investigating leprosy. In March 1900, Pound made the first diagnosis of the bubonic plague outbreak in Brisbane. He also had a hand in ensuring a safe milk supply by securing legislation that required regular tuberculosis-testing of dairy herds.

While retaining his title as Government Bacteriologist, in 1910 Pound transferred to the newly built Stock Experiment Station at Yeerongpilly. Some of the early work of the Station included conducting research into the eradication of cattle ticks and the diseases caused by them, undertaking post mortems and animal husbandry research studies and experiments. Pound retired on 31 July 1932 at the age of sixty-six years, and the position was abolished on 27 April 1933.

Pound contributed much to the control of both veterinary and medical disease in Queensland during his thirty-nine years of service in the Queensland government, but his outstanding contribution was his protective inoculation and extension work on babesiosis which saved hundreds of thousands of cattle from tick fever. His willingness to educate the public on all manner of scientific topics through his lectures using glass lantern slides is also to his credit; and although this was sometimes considered publicity to gain kudos, it nonetheless served a useful purpose in making knowledge available to a public far less informed public than of today which ingratiated him to a wide range of people.

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Registration Number H48980
Classification CH classification MEDICINE Veterinary Science
Name or Title Set of telescoping tubes
History and Use

This set of telescoping tubes was owned and used by Charles Joseph Pound (b.1866 – d.1946), one of Australia’s earliest scientists to investigate veterinary and medical diseases in Queensland during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

It forms part of a larger collection of instruments relating to Pound’s work in Queensland and reflects the transfer of new scientific knowledge and approaches from London to Queensland. The collection comprises an assortment of medical and veterinary implements such as surgical instruments, thermometers, syringes, needles and cannula and tubing. It also includes scales, beam balances, weight sets and a set of telescoping tubes.

Charles Joseph Pound was born in Harrow, England on 30th May 1866. He studied laboratory technology at King’s College, London and became a microscopist before going on to study vaccine preparation and protective inoculation procedures at the Pasteur Institute.

Pound first came to Australia in 1892, after receiving an invitation to set up a bacteriology laboratory at the University of Sydney. It was shortly after his arrival that Pound realised the laboratory had not yet been established and quickly managed to secure a position of practical bacteriological laboratory assistant for the New South Wales Department of Health.

In December 1893, Pound was appointed Director of the newly established Queensland Stock Institute in Brisbane – the first institute laboratory in Queensland dedicated to investigating disease of any kind in both humans and animals. In September 1894, Pound looked into Redwater Disease (Bovine Babesiosis) also known as Tick Fever in the gulf district – it was the first inoculation study into this disease in Australia. Pound found that Redwater Disease was confined to bovines and the disease was transmitted through the bite of cattle ticks. The following year, Pound trained Queensland stockowners in the technique of collecting blood from recovered bovines, defibrinating it and using this vaccine to inoculate their at-risk cattle.

At the recommendation of Pound in July 1899, the Queensland Government built new research laboratories under the new name of the Bacteriological Institute. Administration for the building was transferred to the Health Section of the Home Secretary’s Department and Pound was appointed Queensland Government Bacteriologist. During this period, Pound’s work focused on human health and he carried out unofficial laboratory diagnoses for medical practitioners. During this period, Pound was the only scientist in the country producing tuberculin and investigating leprosy. In March 1900, Pound made the first diagnosis of the bubonic plague outbreak in Brisbane. He also had a hand in ensuring a safe milk supply by securing legislation that required regular tuberculosis-testing of dairy herds.

While retaining his title as Government Bacteriologist, in 1910 Pound transferred to the newly built Stock Experiment Station at Yeerongpilly. Some of the early work of the Station included conducting research into the eradication of cattle ticks and the diseases caused by them, undertaking post mortems and animal husbandry research studies and experiments. Pound retired on 31 July 1932 at the age of sixty-six years, and the position was abolished on 27 April 1933.

Pound contributed much to the control of both veterinary and medical disease in Queensland during his thirty-nine years of service in the Queensland government, but his outstanding contribution was his protective inoculation and extension work on babesiosis which saved hundreds of thousands of cattle from tick fever. His willingness to educate the public on all manner of scientific topics through his lectures using glass lantern slides is also to his credit; and although this was sometimes considered publicity to gain kudos, it nonetheless served a useful purpose in making knowledge available to a public far less informed public than of today which ingratiated him to a wide range of people.

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Registration Number H48978
Classification CH classification MEDICINE Medicine scalpel
CH classification MEDICINE Veterinary Science
Name or Title Scalpel with sheath
History and Use

This scalpal was owned and used by Charles Joseph Pound (b.1866 – d.1946), one of Australia’s earliest scientists to investigate veterinary and medical diseases in Queensland during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

It forms part of a larger collection of instruments relating to Pound’s work in Queensland and reflects the transfer of new scientific knowledge and approaches from London to Queensland. The collection comprises an assortment of medical and veterinary implements such as surgical instruments, thermometers, syringes, needles and cannula and tubing. It also includes scales, beam balances, weight sets and a set of telescoping tubes.

Charles Joseph Pound was born in Harrow, England on 30th May 1866. He studied laboratory technology at King’s College, London and became a microscopist before going on to study vaccine preparation and protective inoculation procedures at the Pasteur Institute.

Pound first came to Australia in 1892, after receiving an invitation to set up a bacteriology laboratory at the University of Sydney. It was shortly after his arrival that Pound realised the laboratory had not yet been established and quickly managed to secure a position of practical bacteriological laboratory assistant for the New South Wales Department of Health.

In December 1893, Pound was appointed Director of the newly established Queensland Stock Institute in Brisbane – the first institute laboratory in Queensland dedicated to investigating disease of any kind in both humans and animals. In September 1894, Pound looked into Redwater Disease (Bovine Babesiosis) also known as Tick Fever in the gulf district – it was the first inoculation study into this disease in Australia. Pound found that Redwater Disease was confined to bovines and the disease was transmitted through the bite of cattle ticks. The following year, Pound trained Queensland stockowners in the technique of collecting blood from recovered bovines, defibrinating it and using this vaccine to inoculate their at-risk cattle.

At the recommendation of Pound in July 1899, the Queensland Government built new research laboratories under the new name of the Bacteriological Institute. Administration for the building was transferred to the Health Section of the Home Secretary’s Department and Pound was appointed Queensland Government Bacteriologist. During this period, Pound’s work focused on human health and he carried out unofficial laboratory diagnoses for medical practitioners. During this period, Pound was the only scientist in the country producing tuberculin and investigating leprosy. In March 1900, Pound made the first diagnosis of the bubonic plague outbreak in Brisbane. He also had a hand in ensuring a safe milk supply by securing legislation that required regular tuberculosis-testing of dairy herds.

While retaining his title as Government Bacteriologist, in 1910 Pound transferred to the newly built Stock Experiment Station at Yeerongpilly. Some of the early work of the Station included conducting research into the eradication of cattle ticks and the diseases caused by them, undertaking post mortems and animal husbandry research studies and experiments. Pound retired on 31 July 1932 at the age of sixty-six years, and the position was abolished on 27 April 1933.

Pound contributed much to the control of both veterinary and medical disease in Queensland during his thirty-nine years of service in the Queensland government, but his outstanding contribution was his protective inoculation and extension work on babesiosis which saved hundreds of thousands of cattle from tick fever. His willingness to educate the public on all manner of scientific topics through his lectures using glass lantern slides is also to his credit; and although this was sometimes considered publicity to gain kudos, it nonetheless served a useful purpose in making knowledge available to a public far less informed public than of today which ingratiated him to a wide range of people.

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Registration Number H48981
Classification CH classification SCIENCES Instruments Weighing weights
Name or Title Five Brass Weights
History and Use

These brass weights were owned and used by Charles Joseph Pound (b.1866 – d.1946), one of Australia’s earliest scientists to investigate veterinary and medical diseases in Queensland during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

It forms part of a larger collection of instruments relating to Pound’s work in Queensland and reflects the transfer of new scientific knowledge and approaches from London to Queensland. The collection comprises an assortment of medical and veterinary implements such as surgical instruments, thermometers, syringes, needles and cannula and tubing. It also includes scales, beam balances, weight sets and a set of telescoping tubes.

Charles Joseph Pound was born in Harrow, England on 30th May 1866. He studied laboratory technology at King’s College, London and became a microscopist before going on to study vaccine preparation and protective inoculation procedures at the Pasteur Institute.

Pound first came to Australia in 1892, after receiving an invitation to set up a bacteriology laboratory at the University of Sydney. It was shortly after his arrival that Pound realised the laboratory had not yet been established and quickly managed to secure a position of practical bacteriological laboratory assistant for the New South Wales Department of Health.

In December 1893, Pound was appointed Director of the newly established Queensland Stock Institute in Brisbane – the first institute laboratory in Queensland dedicated to investigating disease of any kind in both humans and animals. In September 1894, Pound looked into Redwater Disease (Bovine Babesiosis) also known as Tick Fever in the gulf district – it was the first inoculation study into this disease in Australia. Pound found that Redwater Disease was confined to bovines and the disease was transmitted through the bite of cattle ticks. The following year, Pound trained Queensland stockowners in the technique of collecting blood from recovered bovines, defibrinating it and using this vaccine to inoculate their at-risk cattle.

At the recommendation of Pound in July 1899, the Queensland Government built new research laboratories under the new name of the Bacteriological Institute. Administration for the building was transferred to the Health Section of the Home Secretary’s Department and Pound was appointed Queensland Government Bacteriologist. During this period, Pound’s work focused on human health and he carried out unofficial laboratory diagnoses for medical practitioners. During this period, Pound was the only scientist in the country producing tuberculin and investigating leprosy. In March 1900, Pound made the first diagnosis of the bubonic plague outbreak in Brisbane. He also had a hand in ensuring a safe milk supply by securing legislation that required regular tuberculosis-testing of dairy herds.

While retaining his title as Government Bacteriologist, in 1910 Pound transferred to the newly built Stock Experiment Station at Yeerongpilly. Some of the early work of the Station included conducting research into the eradication of cattle ticks and the diseases caused by them, undertaking post mortems and animal husbandry research studies and experiments. Pound retired on 31 July 1932 at the age of sixty-six years, and the position was abolished on 27 April 1933.

Pound contributed much to the control of both veterinary and medical disease in Queensland during his thirty-nine years of service in the Queensland government, but his outstanding contribution was his protective inoculation and extension work on babesiosis which saved hundreds of thousands of cattle from tick fever. His willingness to educate the public on all manner of scientific topics through his lectures using glass lantern slides is also to his credit; and although this was sometimes considered publicity to gain kudos, it nonetheless served a useful purpose in making knowledge available to a public far less informed public than of today which ingratiated him to a wide range of people.

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Registration Number H1138
Classification CH classification PHOTOGRAPHY Processing Equipment film cement
Name or Title Film Cement
History and Use

Film cement is a form of adhesive designed to join motion picture film. It is made of a film base dissolved in a solvent, such as acetone. It is applied to either end of a film strip, which is then placed in a film splicer, which joined the two halves. Film splicers and film cement allowed for the removal and re-ordering of takes.

Motion pictures, or movies as they are commonly known, are not filmed in the exact order that they are scripted, because it is easier to film scenes according to location. Additionally, there are always mistakes made during filming. These are called outtakes. Before the age of digital motion picture cameras, editors would sort through all of the reels of film, selecting the best takes and then producing a master reel of joined footage by cutting up the film and rejoining it in the appropriate order. This object tells the history of the manual film editing process in an age of increasing digital film production.

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Registration Number H22453
Classification CH classification TOYS General toy bird
Name or Title Novelty Bobbing Bird
History and Use

The drinking bird (sometimes known as a ‘bobbing bird’ or ‘dippy bird’) has been sold in various forms, from a science experiment to a children’s toy, since the late 1940s. The design incorporates two glass bulbs connected by a tube (the neck) which is mounted to allow the body to bob forwards and back. The bird is positioned next to a glass of water. After being given an initial ‘drink’, the bobbing bird will repeatedly dip its beak into the glass. Though sold as a novelty item, the bird’s movement is driven by a complex thermodynamic reaction and older models contained toxic chemicals within the tube.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H24234
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Laundering Irons flat
Name or Title Miniature Iron
Production Place USA
Production Date 04 Apr 1871-04 Apr 1872
History and Use

This miniature iron is a made of solid a piece of metal with a removable wooden handle. The iron was detached from the handle and heated on a fire. When it was at temperature the handle could be reattached for ironing. Miniature irons such as this one were used for ironing small and delicate garments.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H24111
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT
CH classification COMMUNICATION
Name or Title Bread Orderer
Production Date Circa 1920s
History and Use

This bread ordering sign dates from around the 1920s. It would have been displayed on the front door to let a passing baker know how many loaves were required by the household. In early Twentieth Century Australia, bread, along with products like milk and stove wood, commonly was delivered to homes by local bakers. The sign is made up of two round plates joined with an eyelet. The number of loaves required can be selected by rotating the bottom plate. The simplicity of the sign also shows that there were fewer types of bread being consumed at this time than now.

The sign is part of a large collection of objects donated to the Queensland Museum by the Marks family. It was used at their house in Wickham Terrace, Brisbane.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H702
Classification CH classification HOROLOGY Chronometers chronometer
Name or Title Chronometer
History and Use

This item is significant as a high precision object which was available (at a price) to ordinary people in the 1890s. It measures not only hours and minutes, but also days, and can be used as a stop watch.

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Registration Number H27110
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Bicycles Parts & Accessories bicycle lamp
Name or Title Carbide Bicycle Lamp
Production Place Birmingham/England
Production Date Circa 1902
History and Use

The Joseph Lucas Company designed many of the most successful bicycle lamps to come out of England. Between 1897 and 1902 the company produced a series of carbide lamps. This object is an ‘Acetyphote’ lamp and was made, modelled on a similar American acetylene lamp. The ‘Acephote’ was first produced in November 1902. Compared to the ‘Microphote’, an earlier model, it was a larger design and utilised acetylene gas, which made it a much brighter lamp.

This lamp was donated to the Queensland Museum as part of the significant Marks collection. The Marks were a prominent Brisbane family who made significant contributions to the fields of science and medicine.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H13171.2
Classification CH classification MEDICINE Medicine model
Name or Title Medical Model, Articulated Hip
Production Place USA
Production Date Circa 1973
History and Use

This is part of a model of an articulated hip provided by a medical supplier. Models such as this are used as advertising by medical suppliers and by medical practitioners to allow explanations of medical conditions and treatments in patient consultation.
The model came from the consulting room of Sir Alexander Murphy (1892-1976), a Physician and Cardiologist who practiced from rooms on Wickham Terrace, Brisbane from the 1920s to the 1970s. Born in Brisbane in 1892, he enlisted in the Australian Army Medical Corps in World War 1, where he served on the Western Front, being awarded a Military Cross. On his return after the war he completed his residency at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney before returning to Brisbane in 1920 where he remained for the rest of his career. Sir Alexander Murphy worked as a consultant physician at the Military Hospital in Greenslopes in World War II, was the foundation Professor of Medicine at the University of Queensland's Medical School where he lectured, and was a foundation member and president of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Continuing to work as a cardiologist and physician throughout his distinguished career, Sir Alexander Murphy was knighted in 1954 for his contribution to medicine.

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Registration Number H13171.3
Classification CH classification MEDICINE Medicine model
Name or Title Medical Model, Articulated Hip
Production Date Circa 1973
History and Use

This is part of a model of an articulated hip provided by a medical supplier. Models such as this are used as advertising by medical suppliers and by medical practitioners to allow explanations of medical conditions and treatments in patient consultation.
The model came from the consulting room of Sir Alexander Murphy (1892-1976), a Physician and Cardiologist who practiced from rooms on Wickham Terrace, Brisbane from the 1920s to the 1970s. Born in Brisbane in 1892, he enlisted in the Australian Army Medical Corps in World War 1, where he served on the Western Front, being awarded a Military Cross. On his return after the war he completed his residency at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney before returning to Brisbane in 1920 where he remained for the rest of his career. Sir Alexander Murphy worked as a consultant physician at the Military Hospital in Greenslopes in World War II, was the foundation Professor of Medicine at the University of Queensland's Medical School where he lectured, and was a foundation member and president of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Continuing to work as a cardiologist and physician throughout his distinguished career, Sir Alexander Murphy was knighted in 1954 for his contribution to medicine.

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Registration Number H45011
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Pest Control fly trap
Name or Title Glass Fly Trap with Stopper
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Registration Number H45126
Classification CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT Food and Drink Consumption
Name or Title Zing! Lemonade drink
Production Place Australian Capital Territory/Australia
Production Date Apr 1973
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Registration Number H22331.18
Classification CH classification COSTUME unisex
Name or Title Expo Oz Suit - Collar
Production Place California/USA
Production Date 1986
History and Use

Mascot for Expo 88 World Fair in Brisbane 1988.
Expo Oz became an international celebrity as the official mascot of World Expo ‘88. Launched on 30 November 1986, he was the focus of publicity leading up to the event, both within and beyond Australia, and later made over 1500 appearances on the Expo site.

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Registration Number H48979
Classification CH classification MEDICINE Medicine tweezers
CH classification MEDICINE Medicine scalpel
CH classification PACKAGES AND CONTAINERS Box wooden box
Name or Title Wooden box containing 5 tweezers and scalpel
History and Use

This wooden box containing tweezers and a scalpel was owned and used by Charles Joseph Pound (b.1866 – d.1946), one of Australia’s earliest scientists to investigate veterinary and medical diseases in Queensland during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

It forms part of a larger collection of instruments relating to Pound’s work in Queensland and reflects the transfer of new scientific knowledge and approaches from London to Queensland. The collection comprises an assortment of medical and veterinary implements such as surgical instruments, thermometers, syringes, needles and cannula and tubing. It also includes scales, beam balances, weight sets and a set of telescoping tubes.

Charles Joseph Pound was born in Harrow, England on 30th May 1866. He studied laboratory technology at King’s College, London and became a microscopist before going on to study vaccine preparation and protective inoculation procedures at the Pasteur Institute.

Pound first came to Australia in 1892, after receiving an invitation to set up a bacteriology laboratory at the University of Sydney. It was shortly after his arrival that Pound realised the laboratory had not yet been established and quickly managed to secure a position of practical bacteriological laboratory assistant for the New South Wales Department of Health.

In December 1893, Pound was appointed Director of the newly established Queensland Stock Institute in Brisbane – the first institute laboratory in Queensland dedicated to investigating disease of any kind in both humans and animals. In September 1894, Pound looked into Redwater Disease (Bovine Babesiosis) also known as Tick Fever in the gulf district – it was the first inoculation study into this disease in Australia. Pound found that Redwater Disease was confined to bovines and the disease was transmitted through the bite of cattle ticks. The following year, Pound trained Queensland stockowners in the technique of collecting blood from recovered bovines, defibrinating it and using this vaccine to inoculate their at-risk cattle.

At the recommendation of Pound in July 1899, the Queensland Government built new research laboratories under the new name of the Bacteriological Institute. Administration for the building was transferred to the Health Section of the Home Secretary’s Department and Pound was appointed Queensland Government Bacteriologist. During this period, Pound’s work focused on human health and he carried out unofficial laboratory diagnoses for medical practitioners. During this period, Pound was the only scientist in the country producing tuberculin and investigating leprosy. In March 1900, Pound made the first diagnosis of the bubonic plague outbreak in Brisbane. He also had a hand in ensuring a safe milk supply by securing legislation that required regular tuberculosis-testing of dairy herds.

While retaining his title as Government Bacteriologist, in 1910 Pound transferred to the newly built Stock Experiment Station at Yeerongpilly. Some of the early work of the Station included conducting research into the eradication of cattle ticks and the diseases caused by them, undertaking post mortems and animal husbandry research studies and experiments. Pound retired on 31 July 1932 at the age of sixty-six years, and the position was abolished on 27 April 1933.

Pound contributed much to the control of both veterinary and medical disease in Queensland during his thirty-nine years of service in the Queensland government, but his outstanding contribution was his protective inoculation and extension work on babesiosis which saved hundreds of thousands of cattle from tick fever. His willingness to educate the public on all manner of scientific topics through his lectures using glass lantern slides is also to his credit; and although this was sometimes considered publicity to gain kudos, it nonetheless served a useful purpose in making knowledge available to a public far less informed public than of today which ingratiated him to a wide range of people.

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Registration Number H48966
Classification CH classification SCIENCES Instruments Weighing balance, beam
Name or Title Pocket Beam Balance
Production Place India
History and Use

This pocket beam balance was owned and used by Charles Joseph Pound (b.1866 – d.1946), one of Australia’s earliest scientists to investigate veterinary and medical diseases in Queensland during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

It forms part of a larger collection of instruments relating to Pound’s work in Queensland and reflects the transfer of new scientific knowledge and approaches from London to Queensland. The collection comprises an assortment of medical and veterinary implements such as surgical instruments, thermometers, syringes, needles and cannula and tubing. It also includes scales, beam balances, weight sets and a set of telescoping tubes.

Charles Joseph Pound was born in Harrow, England on 30th May 1866. He studied laboratory technology at King’s College, London and became a microscopist before going on to study vaccine preparation and protective inoculation procedures at the Pasteur Institute.

Pound first came to Australia in 1892, after receiving an invitation to set up a bacteriology laboratory at the University of Sydney. It was shortly after his arrival that Pound realised the laboratory had not yet been established and quickly managed to secure a position of practical bacteriological laboratory assistant for the New South Wales Department of Health.

In December 1893, Pound was appointed Director of the newly established Queensland Stock Institute in Brisbane – the first institute laboratory in Queensland dedicated to investigating disease of any kind in both humans and animals. In September 1894, Pound looked into Redwater Disease (Bovine Babesiosis) also known as Tick Fever in the gulf district – it was the first inoculation study into this disease in Australia. Pound found that Redwater Disease was confined to bovines and the disease was transmitted through the bite of cattle ticks. The following year, Pound trained Queensland stockowners in the technique of collecting blood from recovered bovines, defibrinating it and using this vaccine to inoculate their at-risk cattle.

At the recommendation of Pound in July 1899, the Queensland Government built new research laboratories under the new name of the Bacteriological Institute. Administration for the building was transferred to the Health Section of the Home Secretary’s Department and Pound was appointed Queensland Government Bacteriologist. During this period, Pound’s work focused on human health and he carried out unofficial laboratory diagnoses for medical practitioners. During this period, Pound was the only scientist in the country producing tuberculin and investigating leprosy. In March 1900, Pound made the first diagnosis of the bubonic plague outbreak in Brisbane. He also had a hand in ensuring a safe milk supply by securing legislation that required regular tuberculosis-testing of dairy herds.

While retaining his title as Government Bacteriologist, in 1910 Pound transferred to the newly built Stock Experiment Station at Yeerongpilly. Some of the early work of the Station included conducting research into the eradication of cattle ticks and the diseases caused by them, undertaking post mortems and animal husbandry research studies and experiments. Pound retired on 31 July 1932 at the age of sixty-six years, and the position was abolished on 27 April 1933.

Pound contributed much to the control of both veterinary and medical disease in Queensland during his thirty-nine years of service in the Queensland government, but his outstanding contribution was his protective inoculation and extension work on babesiosis which saved hundreds of thousands of cattle from tick fever. His willingness to educate the public on all manner of scientific topics through his lectures using glass lantern slides is also to his credit; and although this was sometimes considered publicity to gain kudos, it nonetheless served a useful purpose in making knowledge available to a public far less informed public than of today which ingratiated him to a wide range of people.

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Registration Number H1368
Classification CH classification ARMS & ARMOUR Firearms rifle
Name or Title M96 Ludwig Loewe Boer Mauser
Production Place Berlin/Germany
Production Date 1896
History and Use

Many thousands of these rifles were supplied to the Boers along with other, older patterns of rifles. Many Australian troops returned home with Boer Mausers, and this may be one of these souvenirs.

Inscriptions on this example indicate that it was the ersonal weapon of Boer veteran P.J.A. Heberg (born 26th May 1855) who served under a Boer officer named Veld Cornet VISSER. (a Veld Cornet Visser served under General Jan Smuts).

Heberg's post-war address was VRYBURG (Branch of Veterans was listed as Wolmaransstad). It appears that he was a "Bittereinder" (a man who served to the 'Bitter End' of the war).

He is listed a 'killed' on 2-11-1927 (no reason stated), being survived by his widow Mrs. A.S.J. HEIBERG.

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Registration Number H1592
Classification CH classification ARMS & ARMOUR Firearms revolver
Name or Title Pepperbox revolver (Coopers patent)
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Registration Number H1590
Classification CH classification ARMS & ARMOUR Firearms revolver
Name or Title Pepperbox revolver
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