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Registration Number R7220
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways Model Locomotive
Name or Title Model - SBB Be 4/6 Class Electric Locomotive
Production Place Tokyo/Honshu/Japan
Production Date 1988
History and Use

The T-House model rail collection is a collection of national and international significance due to the size, quality and scope of the collection.

The collection, assembled over 30 years from the 1970s to the 1990s, holds 10 000+ models of locomotives, carriages and wagons. The collection is in excellent – often mint – condition. The models were collected by Mr Marsden Williams, who was born, raised and spent his life in the Wollongong area. Mr Williams was a business man who was renowned for philanthropy, he was an intensely private man, who nevertheless was well connected across the Australian business world. His 40 year fascination for model railways reflected his own interest in precision engineering, and his financial success allowed him to pursue his interest to a remarkable extent.

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Registration Number R5821
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways railway vehicles
Name or Title Camp Wagon
Production Place Ipswich/South East/Queensland/Australia
Production Date Aug 1968
History and Use

This Camp Wagon, used to accomodate track gangs when working away from their home depots, was built at Ipswich Railway Workshops in 1968.
Camp wagons were a great improvement on the tents and bondwood huts that had been used previously by railway track gangs.

It is classed and numbered CW119 and is a 2-berth camp wagon. It was fitted with gas bottles to provide gas for a stove and a refrigerator. Water tanks under the wagon provided fresh water for cooking and washing up.
CW119 was withdrawn from service and stored at Ipswich Railway Workshops in November, 1993.

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Registration Number R5844
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways railway vehicles
Name or Title Panhard Railmotor RM 14
Production Place Ipswich/South East/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1918
History and Use

The Panhard, a small railmotor based on a Panhard Levassor road wagon, was built at the Ipswich Railway Workshops in 1918. Powered by a 20-22 hp petrol engine, it was given the running number 23. Weighing just under 4 tons it had a capacity of 11 people (10 passengers and a driver.)
The vehicle had a 4-wheel bogie at the front and a single fixed axle at the rear. It was opensided with pull-down canvas blinds and also had pull-out canvas awings.

The intention to reduce operating costs on the isolated Normanton-Croydon railway line saw No.23, along with a 4-wheel goods trailer, arrive at Normanton from Townsville, on 18 October 1922. Put to the test a day later, Railmotor No. 23 made a test run from Normanton to Croydon in 4 1/2 hours on 19 October 1922. Goods traffic only amounted to about 5 tons per week and passenger numbers averaged 16 per week during the 1920's - a perfect load for the small railmotor.

The railmotor became affectionately known as the 'Panhard' around the district and subsequent railmotors at Normanton were also called 'Panhards'. The name had such common use that Croydon and Longreach locals would cause confusion by referring to railmotors as 'Panhards' when visiting other parts of the State.

The light weight Panhard became an essential mode of transport between Normanton and Croydon, especially during local floods. The Panhard would still travel with floodwaters covering the the line (although, if the water got too deep, some vital parts would be removed from the engine and it would be pushed through the deeper water).

The little railmotor provided most of the line's services between 1923 and 1929, hauling its goods trailer as well as carrying passengers. The Panhard could only move 4 tons of goods per trip and in 1927 it took a fortnight to move a load of more than 30 tons to Croydon.

A larger railmotor arrived in 1929 displacing No. 23. During that year all railmotor stock in Queensland was renumbered, with the Panhard No. 23 becoming RM14 under the new system.

RM 14 was overhauled in 1932 and, with the exception of 1934 - 1935, worked until it was again overhauled in 1938, when following a test run, it apparently did not re-enter service. RM 14 was written off on 14 April 1941 after which time it was stored in the Normanton workshops.
In December 1968 it was towed to Croydon and transferred to its birthplace, the Ipswich Railway Workshops, where it was restored and placed on display in the open-air steam locomotive museum at Redbank. The museum at Redbank closed in 1992 and the Panhard was removed to under-cover storage.

The Panhard underwent restoration at the Ipswich Railway Workshops again in 2002 before being relocated to its current home in the "One of a Kind" exhibit at The Workshops Rail Museum.

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Registration Number H20890
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways steam locomotive
CH classification RURAL INDUSTRY Agriculture Harvesting
CH classification MACHINERY Engines Steam
Name or Title Narrow Gauge Steam Locomotive - Perry Engineering
Production Place South Australia/Australia
Production Date Jul 1947
History and Use

This 2 ft gauge steam tank locomotive was used in the Queensland sugar industry.
It was built in 1948 by Perry Engineering in South Australia for the Proserpine Mill and sold to Fairymead Mill in Bundaberg in 1964. Whilst at Fairymead Mill it was numbered 21. Fairymead made some alterations to the locomotive, enclosing the rear of the cab and fitting front and rear windows similar in style to the Clyde diesels owned by the mill. They also fitted sprung buffers and drawgear the same as those on the Clyde diesels.
No.21 was sold again in 1970, this time to The Millaquin Sugar Co. for use at the nearby Qunaba mill. (The name Qunaba is interesting in that it derived from the first two letters of each of the three words Queensland National Bank which company purchased the mill in 1899. It was originally named Mon Repos.) At Qunaba it was numbered 3 and named "Flash". In 1978 the locomotive was fitted with a new boiler and higher capacity water tanks. "Flash" worked the 1978 & 1979 cane cutting seasons, but developed leaks around the firebox door, & was withdrawn from use by the end of the 1979 season.
The locomotive was donated to Queensland Museum in 1981.

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Registration Number H14807
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse landau
Name or Title Landau
Production Date 1857-1877
History and Use

Landaus were the most exclusive of carriages and generally used for royalty or leaders of government. The hood could be raised to keep out the weather, or lowered on fine days.

Frank Robertson purchased this landau from Ealing Film Studios in 1948. The carriage had been brought to Australia from England and used in the filming of the movie "The Eureka Stockade." Mr. Robertson purchased the Landau for 75 pounds, and sold it to Bill Bolton in the 1960's for the same amount.
Frank Robertson was an organiser, with Bill Bolton, of the 1959 "Centenary of Transport." He was also an official of the Queensland Royal National Association. The landau was often used for the official opening of the show, notably with Princess Alexandra and Sir Henry Abel Smith in 1959. (Bolton Collection.)

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Registration Number H1
Classification CH classification HOROLOGY Chronometers chronometer
Name or Title Marine chronometer
Production Place London/England
Production Date Circa 1860-1867
History and Use

Marine Chronometers were considered the most accurate method available for keeping time in the past. They were used particularly in maritime navigation. Typically housed wooden boxes, they were equipped with gimbals to compensate for vessel movement.

The number inscribed on this chronometer (3464) indicates it was made by John Poole, Maker to the Admiralty. John Poole was considered one of the great chronometer makers of his time. He is attributed with the invention of ‘Poole’s Auxiliary Compensation’, a device to correct for errors induced in chronometers at low temperatures. In 1867, the year of his death, John Poole was awarded a gold medal at the Paris World Exposition, in recognition of his outstanding work. The business was continued by his brother, James Poole.

The chronometer was owned by the Marks family of Brisbane. In 1933 they sent it to Lilley & Reynolds Ltd., nautical instrument makers in London for repairs. The chronometer was returned to Brisbane on the SS Port Bowen. It was donated to the Museum in 1954.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H14944.1
Classification CH classification ESSENTIAL SERVICES Firefighting fire engine
CH classification TRANSPORT Motor Vehicles truck
Name or Title Fire Engine
Production Place Canada
Production Date 1922
History and Use

This Model-T Ford fire engine was bought by the Boonah Fire Brigade in 1923-24 for £365 and was used to fight fires in the area until 1966.

Fighting fire successfully means getting to the fire quickly with a lot of water. Until the early 20th century horses were the fastest means of getting to a fire, but there was still the problem of how to put it out. Buckets and leather hoses were used first, but it was not until the development of the steam pump in 1829 that water was pumped mechanically.

Modern motorised fire engines like this one were first used in the early 20th century. They could travel fast to the fire and carry fire crews and water. Although fire engines usually had two motors, one to power the vehicle and one to power the pump, this vehicle’s motor was also used to power the water pump to dowse the fire.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number H14875
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse buggy
Name or Title Eureka Buggy
History and Use

The eureka buggy was also known as a 'turn-out seat' buggy because of the collapsible rear seat. The eureka name may derive from a buggy company in the United States, or be due to the hidden rear seat. Mr Walter Brown from St George used this vehicle until the 1930s. It was pulled by two horses and is relatively roomy and strongly built, suitable for country conditions. (Bolton Collection)

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Registration Number H14874
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse sulky
Name or Title Show Sulky
History and Use

From the late 1880s the sulky became the most popular horse drawn vehicle in Australia. They were initially developed in Sydney from the American road cart, which had a short lived period of popularity in the United States. This vehicle has a moulded motor seat and curved dash which became fashionable in the early years of the 20th Century. (Bolton Collection)

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Registration Number H14882
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse dray
Name or Title Tip Dray
History and Use

Tip drays were used to move loads such as rock from mines, manure on farms, an crushed stone for road construction. The dray was constructed of hardwood throughout. Tip dray were usually smaller than the other drays, as the loads were heavy and usually pulled by only one horse. The dray, also called a tip cart, would hold around one tonne of gravel. The tipping lever and mechanism is in the front of the vehicle between the shafts. (Bolton Collection)

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Registration Number H14877
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse buggy
Name or Title Whitechapel & Brewster Buggy
History and Use

Whitechapel bodies were fitted to many different styles of undercarriage. In England the whitechapel bdy was fitted to two wheeled vehicles, but the body style in America was used as a four wheeled buggy. Silky oak timber from Queensland was popular for coachbuilding from around 1900. The Brewster undercarriage used here has side bars with two cross springs onto which the body is attached both back and front. (Bolton Collection)

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Registration Number H20920
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Animal dog cart
Name or Title Dog Cart
History and Use

Dog carts developed in Britain for country hunting trips from the two wheeled passenger gig in the early 1800s. Later versions were popular as a general passenger cart. They were designed to carry additional passengers in a rear facing seat. The original dog carts had a compartment with louvre panels for ventilation under the seats to house hunting dogs. Later models reverted to artificial louvres for decoration only, and were popular as a general passenger cart.. There was also a four-wheel version of the dog cart.

This vehicle was used in the Flagstone Creek area below the Toowoomba Range. It was believed to have been used for mail delivery. The cart has connection points for extra swingle bars and horses outside the shafts to negotiate the hilly country. It was donated by Mr Cyril Horton of Toowoomba in 1992.

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Registration Number H20905
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse cart
Name or Title Spring Cart
History and Use

Spring carts were used for general farm work, but were vital on dairy farms. A relatively quick and smooth ride was needed for cream cans going to the local butter of cheese factory. This cart carried cream in cans to the Springside cheese factory. This vehicle was typical of many spring/dairymen’s carts on Darling Downs and southern Queensland dairy farms 1890-1950. There was no seat on many carts, the driver stood in the cart, or sat on the load of cream cans or wheat sacks. The cart was used on the Tews family dairy and wheat farm at Wangapinni near Pittsworth.
It was donated by the family in 1989, and was restored by the Cobb & Co. Museum.

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Registration Number H20903
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse dray
Name or Title Horse Dray
History and Use

Drays were used as general purpose farm vehicles. Kev Teys purchased this dray for work on his Kingsthorpe dairy and mixed farm in 1950. He donated it to the Cobb & Co. Museum and helped carry out the extensive restoration work needed to repair the vehicle.
There is a wind-on brake on the near side (footpath side) of the dray which would be operated by a driver walking next to the dray rather than riding in it. It was illegal to ride in a dray which was used for heavy haulage, but many drivers would ride on the near side shaft, and jump back onto the road if a policeman was nearby.

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Registration Number H5422
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse sulky
Name or Title Drop Shaft Sulky
Production Place Brisbane/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1900-1920
History and Use

This sulky was sed by the local mailman in the Pinkenba area. A brake is rarely found on such small vehicles which rely on the breeching of the horse for stopping. The brake ensured the vehicle stopped right next to the mailbox, and the mailman did not have to leave his seat. This vehicle was made by Nock & Johnson of Brisbane, in about 1910.

The name 'Sulky' derives from English and American vehicles, where the driver sat high and alone, giving the impression that he was sulking. These light vehicles were the most popular in Australia because of their low cost, stability and comfort. The 'drop shaft' allowed for easier access. These sulkies were popular with ladies who had to climb into the vehicle in the long dresses of the era. Drop shaft sulkies were a Queensland innovation, and were sometimes called Brisbane or Queensland sulkies interstate.

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Registration Number H5420.1
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse buggy
Name or Title Buggy
Production Place Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1913-1933
History and Use

This buggy was built at Forest Hill in southern Queensland. It was used by a farmer from the district. The buggy has a 'turn-out' seat. at the rear. When closed the rear of the buggy could be used for small items of luggage, but when 'turned-out' could seat two children. Two horses would have been harnessed to the pole when the buggy was in use.

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Registration Number H5421
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse cart
Name or Title Spring Cart
Production Date 1870-1890
History and Use

This spring cart was owned by Mr M. Smith of Pinkenbah near the end of the Brisbane River.It carried farm produce from Myrtletown to the Brisbane Markets in Roma Street. It was restored and painted by Alex Hamilton of Hamilton Coachworks around 1980 .

Spring carts were found on every farm. Others could be seen congregated around fruit markets and or used in narrow town streets as general delivery vehicles. The more elaborate carts such as this one were commonly used in towns. Specially designed spring carts were used by bakers, butchers, milkmen, fishmongers and grocers to deliver house to house up until the 1950s when motor cars became more common both for deliveries, and for customers to drive to the new supermarkets.

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Registration Number H8081
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse wagonette
Name or Title Wagonette
Production Date 1860-1890
History and Use

Wagonettes originated in the mid-nineteenth century in Britain. They were stylish and practical carriages used by middle class families for general use such as going on picnics and outings, although wagonettes seating up to 16 passengers were standard public transport in larger towns and cities. It is a vehicle similar to the 4-wheel cabs which were used in Brisbane until the 1920's.

This example was manufactured in the 1870's, and was driven from Sydney to Grandchester (Queensland) by early settlers of that district.

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Registration Number H8309
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse carriage
Name or Title "Four in Hand" Carriage
History and Use

This carriage belonged to Sir Joshua Peter Bell of Jimbour Station near, Dalby, and was widely known as 'the carriage with the yellow wheels'.
It was used on some most historic occassions - the most important, - perhaps, being the election for the Northern Downs seat - as the Dalby electorate was then known - in 1864. On the afternoon of polling day the four-in-hand drove in with Mrs Bell escorted by sixty Jimbour employees riding two abreast - horses and men gaily decorated with ribbons in cerise and white, the Bell colours.
Mr Bell thus began his splendid political career, and the the end of his days represented the same constituency. he occupied nearly every Cabinet portfolio in his time - being Treasurer on several occasions, Minister for Lands, Speaker, President of the Legislative Council, and finally, Acting Governor of Queensland.
In recognition of his services he was granted a knighthood in 1879 - this year coinciding with the completion of his beautiful Jimbour House built at a cost of almost 30 000 pounds.
Carriage may have been imported from the USA by Edds & Co Coachachbuilders of Brisbane. Thay had a similar 'California buggy' on their advertising poster c1870s.
JP Bell is said to have had had a good relationship with the Aboriginal people of the region. His coachman was from the local people and supposedly consider JP Bell a friend.

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Registration Number H8329
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Bullock dray
Name or Title Bullock Dray
Production Place New South Wales/Australia
Production Date 1850-1870
History and Use

Bullock drays were the main form of transport in Australia from around 1800 to the 1870s. Many were used from the 1820s to carry wool bales. Each dray would be pulled by eight to ten bullocks and carried three tonnes of wool.

This Bullock Dray was constructed at Maitland, N.S.W.in around 1860 for Mr Wyndham of Winton Station, Goondiwindi. On its first trip to his property it carried station supplies and two large pots to be used for boiling down cattle and sheep for tallow. After many year use at Winton Station it was given to Donald Gunn of Pikedale, who renovated it and allowed its to be used in the Warwick Centenary in 1940. Mr Gunn, M.L.A. subsequently donated it to the Royal Queensland Historical Society.

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Registration Number R5978
Classification CH classification CIVIC MEMENTOES
CH classification DOCUMENTS Programmes
Name or Title Royal Train Timetable
Production Date 1901
History and Use

A commemorative time table printed in the form of a silk address for the visit of The Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York in May 1901.

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Registration Number R5954
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Builders Plate - Ipswich No.1 1877
Production Place Ipswich/South East/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1877
History and Use

This is one of three builder's plates affixed to the first steam locomotive to be built at the Railway Works, Ipswich. One builder's plate was located on each cab side and the third on the rear of the locomotive tender.
The locomotive was built using spare parts supplied with the first four locomotives built for Queensland's first railway, the Southern & Western.

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Registration Number R5776
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways railway vehicles
CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Builder's Plate - Carriage
Production Place Rocklea/Brisbane/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1951
History and Use

A builder's plate from a wooden Evans type suburban passenger car made by Commonwealth Engineering (Qld) Pty Ltd, Rocklea, Qld.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number R5759
Classification CH classification MILITARY
Name or Title Japanese Military Aircraft, fragment from
Production Place Japan
History and Use

This fragment of a Japanese military aircraft shot down during World War II was sent to the Chemical Laboratory at Ipswich Railway Workshops for analysis and identification of the metal alloy used. The holes across the piece indicate where samples of the metal were taken.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

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Registration Number R5757.1
Classification CH classification
Name or Title Claret Jug
Production Date 1868
History and Use

A sliver claret jug presented to civil engineer, Joseph Brady, by the people of Dalby in appreciation for his work in overseeing the completion of the railway to Dalby in 1868

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The Queensland Museum collection Online is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added regularly.


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