Object Advanced Search : Transport

Results 26 to 50 of 713

Page 2 of 29

Click for Details
Registration Number R518
Classification CH classification COMMUNICATION Postal mailbag
Name or Title Post Office Mail Bag
  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R4807
Name or Title Blouse
  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R5451
Classification CH classification
Name or Title Pith Helmet
  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R22
Classification CH classification TRADES Painting
CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Test Board - Carriage Painter
Production Place Ipswich/South East/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1928-1930
History and Use

This timber board, painted in the late 1920s, was submitted as part of the practical examination at the end of a five year apprenticeship for carriage painters.
The board demonstrated a number of techniques including rub down, putty application, signwriting, painting and varnishing skills learnt through the apprenticeship period. This particular board belonged to apprentice Jim Murphy.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R414
Classification CH classification ESSENTIAL SERVICES Firefighting
Name or Title Helmet - Fire Brigade
History and Use

A brass fireman's helmet worn by members of the Ipswich Railway Workshops fire brigade. These unique looking helmets were originally produced in the United Kingdom by Merryweather & Sons from the the 1860s. After the outbreak of World War II the patterns for the helmet were sent to the Australian firm Rider & Bell of Rhodes, New South Wales. The design had gone out of favour in the UK but was still popular in Australia and were made with Merryweather's blessing.

Rider & Bell produced these helmets between 1940 and the mid-1960s. Queensland fire brigades stop using this type of helmet in 1970.

Railway officials established a railway fire brigade unit at the Ipswich Railway Workshops during February 1866. Volunteers were sought amongst Workshops staff to join the Railway Fire Brigade. Preference was given to those living near the site at North Ipswich should they be required outside of normal working hours.

The Railway Fire Brigade was formed primarily to protect the railway workshops from accidental fires. On occasion, they also turned out to fires in the Ipswich area receiving high praise from local people for their efficiency.

The Ipswich Railway Workshops Fire Brigade continued to operate until 2003.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R91
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Builder's Plate - Wagon
Production Place Birmingham/England
Production Date 1952
History and Use

This builder's plate was affixed by Metropolitan-Cammell Carriage & Wagon Co. Ltd to a wagon they made in 1952 and supplied to Queensland Railways. Plates such as this were used to identify wagons produced in a company workshop.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R36
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Builder's Plate - Wagon
Production Place Ipswich/South East/Queensland/Australia
History and Use

This is a builder's plate that had been affixed to a wagon made by Shillito & Son, Ipswich at a date unknown. Shillito made many wagons for Queensland Railways prior to 1900.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R394
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT
Name or Title Headboard - "Sunlander"
Production Date 1950s
History and Use

A metal headboard used on the air-conditioned train service operating between Brisbane and Cairns. The "Sunlandedr" service commenced operating 4/6/1953. These metal headboards were replaced by illuminated headboards in the 1970s.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R734
Classification CH classification PERSONAL EFFECTS Travel Goods
Name or Title Leather Bag
History and Use

Mr R Scott, a former Queensland Railways employee, used this Gladstone bag. Gladstone bags were commonly used by railway staff particularly in areas like the Traffic Branch (locomotive drivers, firemen, guards) and workers at Ipswich Railway Workshops. They were used to carry their lunches and other personal effects

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R393
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT
Name or Title Headboard - "Inlander"
History and Use

A metal headboard affixed to the front of the air-conditioned passenger services operating between Townsville and Mount Isa. The first service commenced 12/2/1953.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H14814
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse sulky
Name or Title Show Sulky
Production Place Queensland/Australia
History and Use

The drop shaft allows easier access into the sulky which was always a concern for the ladies in long dresses of the early 1900s. There are metal plated sarven wheel hubs and mud-guards.

This vehicle has short shafts and must have been pulled by a quite small pony.
The drop shaft or bent shaft sulky became popular with Brisbane coachbuilders in the early days of this century. As with all the sulkies, a handle was fitted under the seat which adjusted the seat to balance the vehicle. The name sulky is a misnomer and its use was opposed by many coachbuilders who preferred the term ‘road cart’. A sulky was traditionally a single person vehicle.

This vehicle belonged to Mr Francis Young of The Grange, Brisbane. (Bolton Collection)

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H14811
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse phaeton
Name or Title Phaeton
History and Use

The pony phaeton became a fashionable family vehicle in Australia in the 19th century. 'Phaetons' were high-class vehicles for wealthy people which were driven by the owner rather than a coachman. The square lines of this vehicle are somewhat disguised by the use of curved mudguards instead of the traditional straight form usually found on pony phaetons. It is believed that this vehicle dates from the 1860s and was used by Sir George Ferguson Bowen, the first Governor of Queensland.
This four-wheeled passenger vehicle exhibits a vis-a-vis seating arrangement. The driver sits on the rear spindle-back seat and a rein holder is attached to the back of the front seat. (Bolton Collection)

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H14816
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse sulky
Name or Title Cape Cart (Rutherford Pole Sulky)
History and Use

The Cape Cart has a pole to harness two horses, which is unusual for sulkies in Australia. The syle originated in South Africa where, like Australia, journeys could be over long distances.The cross bar at the end of the pole which attaches to the horse collars is found more commonly on American vehicles.

The cart was believed to have been manufactured in the Cobb & Co. factory in Charleville and used by James Rutherford, the managing director of the company, to inspect the company’s Queensland operations.
(Bolton Collection)

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H14813
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse buggy
Name or Title Toledo Buggy
History and Use

The toledo buggy has 'Timkin' side-bar undercarriage, and may have come from a coach factory in Toledo in the the United States. Timkins were makers of buggies and buggy components, and in the 1890s developed roller bearing hubs for carriages. The style of bearing is still used in wheeled road and rail vehicles.The seats in the buggy can be arranged in a number of ways, or the rear seat can be folded away completely to allow for extra luggage or goods on the tray back. Buggies with removable rear seats were popular with farming families because of their vesatility. (Bolton Collection)

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H14810
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse buggy
Name or Title Abbot Buggy
History and Use

This Abbot buggy was owned by Mrs Kent of Jondaryan, a large pastoral property near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs. These popular buggy had a slight upward sweep of the floor, which is evidence of its development from small farm wagons in the eastern United States, the early 1800s. Abbot buggies were first produced by Abbot, Downing & Co. of Concord Massachusetts.This buggy has interchangable shafts for one horse, or pole for two horses.

(Bolton Collection)

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H14815
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse sulky
Name or Title Straight Shaft Sulky
History and Use

This sulky has a brake and very long shafts which made it suitable for breaking in horses. The 2.8m shafts with an extra hitching position kept the untrained horse away from the vehicle body. This saved damage to the sulky if the horse started kicking. The brake helped stop the horse from bolting, and to learn commands to ‘whoa’.

This simple tray sulky was a handy general purpose vehicle for two passengers and a fair quantity of goods, or produce such as milk cans, besides its usefulness in breaking in horses . (Bolton Collection)

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H14809
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse wagonette
Name or Title Family Wagonette
History and Use

Wagonettes became popular with wealthy people from the time of the Great Exhibition in London in 1851 as they were more practical than the phaetons and particularly suitable for general-purpose use by country folk. Some wagonettes were used as passenger cabs in Australia.

This vehicle was owned by Misses Sarah and Elizabeth Crawford of Crawfordburn then on the outskirts of Toowoomba. (Bolton Collection)

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number H14812
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Horse buggy
Name or Title Piano Box Buggy
History and Use

This piano box buggy belonged to Mr Francis Young of The Grange, Brisbane. In the early 1900s the suburb was semirural. Piano box buggies were a very popular style and produced in large numbers in America and Australia. (Bolton Collection)

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R825
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Builder's Plate - B13 Class locomotive No.195
Production Place Glasgow/Scotland
Production Date 1886
History and Use

This builder's plate is from No.195 a B13 Class locomotive built by Dubs & Co, Glasgow Locomotive Works in 1886. It entered service as Great Northern Railway No.20 on 5 August 1887. No.20 was renumbered 195 under the State System in 1890. It was written off in March, 1940.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R827
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Builder's Plate - C17 Class Locomotive No.816
Production Place Newcastle upon Tyne/Tyne & Wear/England
Production Date 1927
History and Use

This Builder's Plate was attached to a C17 Class 4-8-0 locomotive No.816. Twenty-five C17 Class locomotives were builtfor Queensland Railways by Sir W. G. Armstrong Whitworth & Co at their works in Newcastle-on-Tyne, England in 1927. No.816 entered service in July 1927 and was withdrawn from service in May, 1964.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R822
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Builder's Plate - B15 Con Class Locomotive No.292
Production Place Sheffield/South Yorkshire/England
Production Date 1896
History and Use

This Builder's Plate is from B15 Con Class Locomotive No.292. Manufactured by the Yorkshire Engine Co., No. 292 locomotive entered service on 30 April 1897 for the Great Northern Railway in north Queensland. It was written off on 30 June 1965.
The Yorkshire Engine Co. only supplied ten steam locomotives to Queensland Railways.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R821
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Name Plate - "Centenary"
Production Place Ipswich/South East/Queensland/Australia
Production Date 1923
History and Use

This nameplate was one of two nameplates fitted to C19 Class No.702 built in 1923 at Ipswich Railway Workshops. It was the 100th steam locomotive built at Ipswich and the name celebrates that. Locomotive No.702 was written off in 1962.
The naming of steam locomotives on Queensland Railways was rare with only seven steam locomotives ever carrying a name.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R819
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Locomotive Bell
Production Place Philadelphia/USA
History and Use

This locomotive bell came from one of the steam locomotives supplied to Queensland Railways by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philedelphia, USA in 1882 - 1885. Locomotives supplied by Baldwin came with a locomotive bell as was standard practice in the United States. They were not standard in Queensland however and were soon removed when in service on Queensland Railways.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R823
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Builder's Plate - B15 Converted Class Locomotive No.306
Production Place Maryborough/South East/Queensland/Australia
History and Use

This Builder's Plate is from No.306 a B15 Converted Class steam locomotive. It entered service on the 26 June 1897 as a B15 Class. It was rebuilt as a B15 Converted and re-entered service in September 1912. No.306 was mainly based in the Northern Division working out of Cairns, Townsville and Bowen. It was withdrawn from service on 21 March 1967.

  • Top
Click for Details
Registration Number R820
Classification CH classification TRANSPORT Railways
Name or Title Locomotive Whistle
History and Use

A brass steam locomotive chime whistle used for sounding warnings and in communication for safeworking.

This particular locomotive whistle was able to emit three different sounds.

  • Top
  • Shortlist Functions
  • 0 results in shortlist


About the database

The Queensland Museum collection Online is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added regularly.


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about an object or specimen, please email:
qm.vernon@qm.qld.gov.au

Page 2 of 29