Amulet, Heket (frog)

Production date
1550 BCE-1069 BCE
Country
Egypt
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Object Detail


Description
Blue green faience amulet in the form of a squatting frog, representing Heket. Some wear to glaze.
Classification
CH classification ARCHAEOLOGY Egyptian amulet
Production place
Measurements
H10mm x W12mm x D16mm
Media/Materials description
Faience, green glaze
History and use
This is one of four blue-green glazed faience amulets, in the form of a squatting frogs, which were excavated from Deir el- Bahri, near Thebes, Egypt. The deity most commonly associated with the frog was Heket. To the ancient Egyptians, the frog was a symbol of fertility, creation and regeneration. Frog amulets were sometimes included in the wrappings of mummies, or carried as talismans. Frog amulets represent life and fertility, particularly the last stages of the annual flood. The frog-headed goddess Heqet was popular among women and associated with the final stages of child birth. Midwives are typically referred to as “servants of Heqet”. As these do not have holes for suspension they were not worn as jewellery.
Registration number
E40029.4

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