Flageolet

Production date
Circa 1803
Country
England
See full details

Object Detail


Description
Flageolet, a wooden duct flute with seven fingerholes (six on the front and one at the rear of the instrument) and two brass keys. The flute consists of an ivory mouth piece, finger guides and three rings. The instrument has notes marked on the seven finger holes and two keys to assist the player.
Classification
CH classification MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Wind recorder
Production place
Measurements
L 406 x Dia.36 mm
Media/Materials description
Ivory, wood, brass
Signature/Marks
Bainbridge \ Inventor \ Patent
Bainbridge \ 35 \ Holborn \ Hill \ London \ Patent
History and use
A flageolet is a woodwind instrument in the flute family. This wooden duct flute has seven fingerholes (six on the front and one at the rear of the instrument) and two brass keys. The flute consists of an ivory mouth piece, finger guides and decorative rings. The instrument was made by William Bainbridge, the English instrument maker who patented the “improved English flageolet” in 1803. The English flageolet design, with six finger-holes as opposed to the French instruments which commonly had four holes, was later commonly produced in metal as a tin whistle. The English flageolet is said to be easy to play with a soft, gentle tone and a range of two octaves.

The instrument is part of a large collection of objects donated to the Queensland Museum by Dr E.N. Marks. The Marks were a prominent Brisbane family who made significant contributions to the fields of science and medicine.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.
Associated person
Registration number
H13111

Country

Colours

Share