Bread Orderer

Production date
Circa 1920s
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Object Detail


Description
2 round metal plates, painted red with white/cream text, joined with eyelet in the middle. Small hole in the top acts as a hook for attaching ordererer to door. The number of loaves can be selected by rotating the bottom plate with the numerical value on it. Paint is worn.
Classification
CH classification DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT
CH classification COMMUNICATION
Measurements
Dia.101 mm
Media/Materials description
Tin
Signature/Marks
LOAVES \ BREAD
0 \ ½ \ 1 \ 1 ½ \ 2 \ 2 ½ \ 3 \ 4
History and use
This bread ordering sign dates from around the 1920s. It would have been displayed on the front door to let a passing baker know how many loaves were required by the household. In early Twentieth Century Australia, bread, along with products like milk and stove wood, commonly was delivered to homes by local bakers. The sign is made up of two round plates joined with an eyelet. The number of loaves required can be selected by rotating the bottom plate. The simplicity of the sign also shows that there were fewer types of bread being consumed at this time than now.

The sign is part of a large collection of objects donated to the Queensland Museum by the Marks family. It was used at their house in Wickham Terrace, Brisbane.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.
Associated person
Registration number
H24111

Category

Colours

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