Medallion, Children's Peace

Production date
1919
Country
Australia
State/Province
New South Wales
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Object Detail


Description
Medallion, Obv: female figure (Peace) flanked by two doves standing over two male crouching figures. Figure on left in chains and n right entangled in vegetation., The words "Peace 1919 Australia" are inscribed in base. Makers name "Amor Ltd" on obverse rim.. Rev: the word "Victory" super imposed on rays of the sun and crown over the words "The Triumph of Liberty and Justice", surrounded by wreath flanked by sailor and soldier all over words "THE PEACE OF 1919" Plain edge with loop at top.
Classification
CH classification NUMISMATICS (MEDALS AND OTHER) Commemorative Medallion
Measurements
32 x 27 x 2mm. Dia 27mm.
Media/Materials description
Metal (Silvered brass)
Signature/Marks
PEACE \ 1919 \ AUSTRALIA
AMOR LTD
VICTORY \ THE \ TRIUMPH \ OF \ LIBERTY \ AND \ JUSTICE \ THE PEACE OF \ 1919
CDR
History and use
‘Peace’ or ‘Victory’ medallions were issued after World War 1 to every child in Australia aged 0-14 years and up to 16 years if their parents were in the armed forces. The medallion was designed by Melbourne-based sculptor and painter Charles Douglas Richardson and red, white and blue striped ribbons and pins were supplied by the Department of Defence. The Department contracted the manufacture of the medallions to six companies: two in Melbourne, two in Sydney and one each in Brisbane and Adelaide.

The distribution of the medallions to an estimated 1.25 million eligible Australian children began in March 1919 with the intention that they be presented on or around the Australia-wide peace celebrations on 19 July that year. However, in those days of limited sea and land transport, this was not easy; the Peace Celebrations Committee in Brisbane received 247,000 medallions for distribution across the State just one week before 19 July and as a result children in more remote areas did not receive their medallions until well after the big day.

The peace celebrations were a major occasion throughout Australia. Many communities celebrated for up to a week with triumphal arches, decorated shopfronts, parades, fireworks, musical performances, sports carnivals and religious services. Not everybody supported such extravagances; some believed the resources devoted to the celebrations would be better spent on the welfare of returned soldiers and their dependents.
Registration number
N42

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