Cinematograph

Production date
Circa 1898
Country
France
State/Province
Ile-de-France
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Object Detail


Description
Rectangular wooden box with smaller wooden film cassette mounted on top. The back section and front panel are hinged and open up to reveal internal workings. In the top left hand corner of the front panel is a lens. Black plaque is mounted in the centre of front panel and is inscribed with makers details.
Classification
CH classification PHOTOGRAPHY Cameras Cine cinematographe
Production place
Measurements
L197 x W156 x H285 (closed, with film cassette in place.)
Media/Materials description
Wood, brass, glass
Signature/Marks
CINEMATOGRAPHE / Auguste et Louis Lumiere / Brevete S.G.D.G. / J,, Carpentier, Ingenieur Constructeur / Paris
J. CARPENTIER / PARIS
296
History and use
The Lumiere Cinematographe, invented in France in 1894, was a portable projector, camera, and film processor in one. It was invented by Auguste and Louis Lumiere - French brothers, whose designs strongly shaped the future and popularity of modern cinema. This is one of the models manufactured by Jules Carpentier, who was approached by Louis Lumiere at a Cinematographe demonstration.

There are only 12 known examples of the Cinematographe in the world today. Three are in Australia, of which this is the only one still in operating condition. It was acquired by the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Stock in 1899 and was used by the Department's artist and photographer Frederick Charles Wills and his assistant Henry William Mobsby. Together they comprised the worlds first government-funded film unit.

Footage filmed with this Cinematographe includes scenes of the opening of Queensland parliament, sugar mills in Nambour, and Boer War soldiers marching on Queen Street, Brisbane. The 43 surviving reels of film Wills and Mobsby took comprise the largest collection of Australian film still in existence.

Uploaded to the Web 27 May 2011.
Registration number
H838.4

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