Penny in Slot Golf Machine

Production date
1896-1905
Country
England
See full details

Object detail

Description
Green, blue and red painted cast iron arcade game featuring six painted golfing figures positioned inside glass case. Coin operated, with two handles in front face that operate the golfers. There is a key hole in the front of the stand for access to a coin depository. Golfers wearing red cotton textile jackets and painted blue pants with white socks. Larger metal, cast versions of the golfers are in relief on the top of the machine.
Classification
CH classification RECREATIONS Amusements pinball machine
CH classification TOYS Mechanical
Production date
1896-1905
Production place
Measurements
L220 x W515 x H1375 mm
Media/Materials description
Indeterminate (Glass)
Iron (Metals - Ferrous)
Indeterminate (Metals - Indeterminate)
Cotton (Textiles)
Signature/Marks
<on top front of cabinet > GOLF
<Printed on front glass panel > MATTHEWSON'S PATENT \ PENNY RETURNED EVERY TIME YOU MAKE THE 3 HOLES \ 1,2, & 3 BEFORE LOSING THE BALL. \ OBJECT OF THE GAME \ TO MAKE THE HOLES WITH THE FEWEST POSSIBLE STROKES \ DIRECTIONS \ TO OBTAIN BALL PLACE ONE PENNY IN SLOT, PRESS HANDLE GENTLY \ THEN PRESS EITHER HANDLE ACCORDING TO POSITION OF BALL \ THIS MACHINE IS THE PROPERTY OF THE AUTOMATIC SPORTS CO., \ 5 DENMAN ST., LONDON BRIDGE S.E
History and use
Designed by London’s Automatic Sports Company, this game was part of an amusement arcade in the ‘halfway house’ shelter on the Redcliffe Jetty from 1938. The ‘halfway house’ was a resting place in the middle of the jetty, providing shade and relaxation for walkers. Also known as a waiting shed, the shelter was run by proprietor Harry Pearson from 1938-1952, and in this time he enclosed a section to create an amusement arcade. Jerry and Vera Woodhead took over the running of the halfway house from 1952. The jetty was demolished in 1973.

Prior to its location at Redcliffe, the golf machine is thought to have been stationed in a penny arcade adjacent to the entrance of the Sandgate Pier. Seaside arcades and jetties were popular recreation destinations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, forming part of a wider seaside leisure complex which provided accommodation, group activities, cheap entertainment and restorative health benefits. Bayside areas in Queensland were popular from particularly early on, with the first railway line within Brisbane running to Sandgate.
Registration number
H5963

Share

My shortlist

Country

Explore other objects by colour