Penny in Slot Cricket Machine

Production date
Circa 1901
Country
England

Description
Cast iron slot machine painted red, green, yellow and black with glass housing for game components. The base is rectangular. The stand features cricket bat and ball motifs on front and back, and wicket motifs on each side - all in relief. Above this are the controls/levers, that are in a recess which has been covered in clear perspex. On the left hand side there is keyhole to access the coin depository. Above this, on the right hand side, is the coin slot. The museum have fastened a perspex sign to the front reading 'Please do not touch'. Inside the clear glass casing is the cricket pitch with a batsman and bowler. The playing surface is curved to direct ball movement. The centre is green with a light brown edging. Two holes, either side of the wicket. The batsman wears a green cap, and has a painted beard and white fabric jacket. Two holes either side of the bowler. The bowler wears a red cap and white fabric jacket and pants.
There are 2 holes at either end on the outside of the white picket fence reading 'Boundary'. Above the case there is a red gabled roof. The patent information is attached in a plaque on the centre front. Above this is a cast coat of arms with lion and unicorn motifs either side of the coat of arms symbol.
Classification
CH classification RECREATIONS Amusements pinball machine
Production place
Measurements
L1950 x W550 x D235 mm
Media/Materials description
Iron (Metals - Ferrous)
Indeterminate (Glass)
Signature/Marks
<into front face of stand> REGD DESIGN
<in coat of arms>MATTHEWSON'S PATENT
<in ribbon underneath coat of arms> BY ROYAL LETTERS PATENT
Please do not touch
<positioned near various holes in the floor of the game> Stumped \ Bowled \ Caught (x2) \ Boundary (x4)
<On plaque on roof of machine>THE CRICKET MATCH \ YOUR PENNY RETURNED EVERY TIME BALL \ GOES DOWN ANY HOLE MARKED BOUNDARY \ TO OBTAIN BALL PLACE PENNY IN SLOT AND \ PRESS HANDLE GENTLY \ THEN PLAY AS YOU PLEASE \ THIS MACHINE IS PROPERTY OF THE AUTOMATIC SPORTS CO. LTD. [text obscured] S.E
History and use
This machine was made in 1901 and imported from England in the early twentieth century. The design was patented in 1899 by Ernest G. Matthewson, an engineer and owner of London’s Automatic Sports Company.

The game was first housed in a penny arcade adjacent to the entrance of the Sandgate Pier. It cost a penny to use the pier, which at that time had separate men’s and women’s bathing areas. If you didn’t want to walk on the pier, you could go to the games arcade and spend your pennies on games of skill, such as this one. This cricket game was later moved to an amusement arcade on the Redcliffe Jetty.
Registration number
H5964

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