Kohl Jar, Alabaster, lid

Production date
1550 BCE-1096 BCE
Country
Egypt
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Object Detail


Description
Lid from Kohl Jar, alabaster lid. Undecorated.
Classification
CH classification ARCHAEOLOGY Egyptian pot
Production place
Measurements
H10mm x W65mm xD10mm
Media/Materials description
Calcite. Also known as alabaster or travertine
Signature/Marks
<..../Tuna?/.../89>
History and use
In ancient Egypt, both men and women used a dark substance called kohl, as eye make-up. Kohl is a black powder made of crushed lead ore (galena) and fat. It was used not only to highlight the eyes, to reduce glare, repel flies or drawing protective amulets on the skin. Such containers were included in tombs and burials, indicating that the ancient Egyptians believed that kohl would also be required in the afterlife. Kohl was applied via the finger, glass rod or reed. In the Middle Kingdom, the preferred shape for kohl jars was a squat jar and wide, flat rim. A small piece of cloth bound the lid to the body of the vessel. Alabaster was a precious and sought after material, indicating that the owner of this jar was wealthy.
Registration number
H8286.2

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