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197 results. Displaying results 81 - 120.

Purple-edged Nudibranch
Summary
The Purple-edged Nudibranch is an attractive, moderately large (50-120 mm) and often-encountered shallow water sea slug. It occurs in subtropical and tropical Australia
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Pustulose Phyllidiid
Summary
The Pustulose Phyllidiid is a nudibranch that lives on coral substrates in the lower intertidal zone and down to about 30 m depth, where it may be seen crawling during the day. It is one of the most common nudibranchs in the tropical Indo-west Pacific.
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Lotus Flower Nudibranch
Summary
The Lotus Flower Nudibranch lives on shallow water reefs (intertidal down to 30 m) where it feeds on the polyps of hydroids (sea ferns). It occurs in temperate, subtropical and tropical Australia.
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Nudibranchs
Summary
Nudibranchs (naked-gilled sea-slugs) include some of the most colourful and flamboyant of sea creatures. There are around 3000 valid species in this Molluscan group. Many have bright and elaborate colour patterns as spectacular as those seen in some butterflies.
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Cleaner Shrimps & allies
Summary
This interesting group of small benthic decapod crustaceans belongs to the Infraorder Stenopodidea. It includes only six species in two families in Australian waters, with the Banded Coral Shrimp always the most common and conspicuous.
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Peacock Mantis Shrimp
Summary
The Peacock Mantis Shrimp is an active hunter that seeks and eats other crustaceans, small fish and molluscs. It is found across northern Australia and widespread in the Indo-West Pacific region.
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Bold-spotted Anemone Shrimp
Summary
The Bold-spotted Anemone Shrimp has, as its name suggests, bold patterning. It grows up to 20 mm in length. It occurs on reefs and may be found on Haddon’s Anemone in channels and pools at Dunwich, North Stradbroke Island. Northern Australia; Indo-Pacific region.
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Pacific Clown Anemone Shrimp
Summary
The Pacific Clown Anemone Shrimp is common on coral and rocky reefs in the subtidal zone. Occurs singly or in pairs, on Haddon’s Anemone, and also on other anemones and sea cucumbers. Northern Australia.
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Estuarine Stonefish
Summary
Stonefish are the most venomous of all fishes. They are found throughout shallow coastal waters of the northern half of Australia. Stonefish are extremely well camouflaged and often almost indistinguishable from their natural surrounds. The venomous dorsal fin spines can cause extremely painful wounds and other serious medical issues.
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Bullrout
Summary
Bullrout are responsible for most fish stings that occur in upper tidal reaches and freshwaters of New South Wales and Queensland. The venomous fin spines can cause painful wounds. They are an ambush predator of small fish and crustaceans, hiding amongst snags and aquatic plants.
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Amethyst Olive
Summary
The Amethyst Olive is one of the commonest and most widespread of the olive snail family (Olividae). This species is found buried in subtidal sandy areas especially associated with coral reefs and lagoons in subtropical and tropical Australia.
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Golden Orb-Weaving Spiders
Summary
The three species of Golden Orb-Weaving Spiders found in Queensland (in the genera Trichonephila and Nephila) are familiar denizens of urban environments throughout the state. The most commonly encountered species, Trichonephila plumipes, is abundant in backyards in eastern Queensland, including around Brisbane.
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Common Garden Spiders
Summary
Spiders are ubiquitous in gardens, houses and urban environments throughout Queensland, and a wide variety of species can easily be found, especially in the eastern tropics and subtropics. The species accounts below highlight some of the more frequently encountered species in Queensland backyards.
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Tent-Web Spiders
Summary
Tent-Web Spiders (genus Cyrtophora) are found throughout eastern and tropical northern Australia, with three species often found in urban environments. The largest and most commonly encountered species, C. moluccensis, is abundant in backyards in eastern Queensland, including around Brisbane.
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Northern Green Jumping Spider
Summary
The Northern Green Jumping Spider (Mopsus mormon) is one of Australia’s largest jumping spiders, and a common resident of backyards in tropical climates, including around Brisbane. The spiders are green throughout their lives, but adult males and females exhibit strong sexual dimorphism, with males characterised by a pronounced fringe of white ‘whiskers’.
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Blue-lined Octopus
Summary
The Blue-lined Octopus grows to about 15 cm in armspan, but is often much smaller. It is easily recognised by the iridescent blue lines on the body and linked blue rings on the arms and webs, however this is a warning colouration and only obvious when the animal is aggravated. This species is only found from southern Queensland to southern NSW.
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Diamondback Squid
Summary
The Diamondback Squid is instantly recognisable by its large size, bright red colouration and distinctive, angular shape (echoed in the specific name 'rhombus'). The main body can reach 1 metre and with tentacle length combined, the entire animal may be up to 2 metres in overall length. It is found Australia-wide but is sporadic.
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Richmond River Keeled Snail
Summary
The Richmond River Keeled Snail has an elevated spire and a strikingly-keeled shape. It occurs in the forests of Tamborine Mountain and Lamington National Park near Brisbane.
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Cleft-fronted Bait Crab
Summary
The Cleft-fronted Bait Crab has short hairs on its body and legs, and can reach 70 mm in carapace width. It occurs in eastern Qld; also subtropical and tropical western and eastern Pacific (north to Japan and south-east to Easter Island).
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Honeycomb Coral Crab
Summary
The Honeycomb Coral Crab features honeycomb patterning over its shell and claws. It lives commensally with a variety of branching corals, and is found in northern Australia. Also found in the eastern Indian Ocean, western Pacific and north to Japan.
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