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Name Summary Subject categories
Common Crow, Euploea corinna, pinned adult male specimen. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Garden Butterflies
Butterflies are common visitors to backyards and a wide variety of species drop in to feed on nectar from blossoms. Some are regular garden-dwellers, their caterpillars feeding on widely-grown garden plants or street trees. A few species are even pests of citrus, palms and vegetables.
Insects
Butterflies
The Striped Marshfrog, Limnodynastes peronii. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Striped Marshfrog
The Striped Marshfrog is light brown to grey-brown and marked with bold, dark longitudinal stripes. It is widespread in coastal eastern Australia and also occurs in Tasmania.
Frogs
Bullrout, Notesthes robusta. © Queensland Museum, Bruce Cowell. Bullrout
Bullrout are responsible for most fish stings that occur in upper tidal reaches and freshwaters of New South Wales and Queensland. The venomous fin spines can cause painful wounds. They are an ambush predator of small fish and crustaceans, hiding amongst snags and aquatic plants.
Fish
Estuarine Stonefish, Synanceia horrida. © Queensland Museum. Estuarine Stonefish
Stonefish are the most venomous of all fishes. They are found throughout shallow coastal waters of the northern half of Australia. Stonefish are extremely well camouflaged and often almost indistinguishable from their natural surrounds. The venomous dorsal fin spines can cause extremely painful wounds and other serious medical issues.
Fish
Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas. © Queensland Museum, Gary Cranitch. Green Turtle
The Green Turtle is a large turtle with a bullet-shaped head and four large scales down either side of the shell. It is found in coastal, tropical and subtropical waters worldwide.
Turtles
Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata Hawksbill Turtle
The Hawksbill Turtle is a medium-sized turtle with a narrow head and beak-like snout. The shell has four large scales down either side which are thick and overlapping. It is found in tropical seas of northern Australia, the central Atlantic and Indo-Pacific regions.
Turtles
Loggerhead Turtle, Caretta caretta Loggerhead Turtle
The Loggerhead Turtle is a large turtle with a broad, triangular head and powerful crushing jaws. It is found in coastal, tropical and subtropical waters around the world.
Turtles
Carpet Snake, Morelia spilota. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Carpet Snake or Carpet Python
Carpet snakes are extremely variable in colour and pattern. Most specimens are olive green, with pale, dark-edged blotches, stripes or cross-bands. This species is widespread and found throughout northern, eastern and southern Australia.
Snakes
Eastern Brown Snake, Pseudonaja textilis, Adult. © Steve Wilson. Eastern Brown Snake
The Eastern Brown Snake may be any shade of brown but can also be grey or black. Some individuals are banded. The belly is typically cream with pink or orange spots. It is found over most of Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.
Snakes
Keelback Snake, Tropidonophis mairii. © Jeff Wright, Queensland Museum. Freshwater Snake (Keelback Snake)
The Freshwater Snake is olive brown with irregular dark cross-bands. This species grows to 75 cm. It is found in coastal areas of northern Australia from northern New South Wales to the Kimberley, Western Australia.
Reptiles
Snakes
Female Cyrtophora moluccensis hanging upside-down in its tent-web. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Tent-Web Spiders
Tent-Web Spiders (genus Cyrtophora) are found throughout eastern and tropical northern Australia, with three species often found in urban environments. The largest and most commonly encountered species, C. moluccensis, is abundant in backyards in eastern Queensland, including around Brisbane.
Spiders
Male Mopsus mormon. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Northern Green Jumping Spider
The Northern Green Jumping Spider (Mopsus mormon) is one of Australia’s largest jumping spiders, and a common resident of backyards in tropical climates, including around Brisbane. The spiders are green throughout their lives, but adult males and females exhibit strong sexual dimorphism, with males characterised by a pronounced fringe of white ‘whiskers’.
Spiders
Female Trichonephila plumipes in orb web. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Golden Orb-Weaving Spiders
The three species of Golden Orb-Weaving Spiders found in Queensland (in the genera Trichonephila and Nephila) are familiar denizens of urban environments throughout the state. The most commonly encountered species, Trichonephila plumipes, is abundant in backyards in eastern Queensland, including around Brisbane.
Spiders
Cane Toad, Rhinella marina, showing large venom glands behind the ear and typically warty skin. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Cane Toad
Cane Toads have tough, leathery skin with a distinctly warty appearance. They are native to North, Central and South America and were introduced to Queensland to control cane beetles.
Toads
Mud-dauber wasp, Sceliphron laetum. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Mud Dauber Wasp
Mud-dauber wasps build mud nests in sheltered situations such as caves, overhangs or even inside buildings. They are found across mainland Australia.
Insects
Wasps
Potter wasp, Abispa ephippium. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Potter Wasp
Predatory potter wasps build nests from a mixture of mud and saliva, and fills them with paralysed caterpillars. It is widespread across mainland Australia
Insects
Wasps
Assassin bug, Gminatus wallengreni. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Assassin Bugs
Assassin Bugs use their proboscis to impale prey (insects and spiders) and inject digestive enzymes that liquefy the body tissues. The bug then sucks up the juices through the proboscis, which acts like a straw.
Insects
Bugs
Common assassin bug, Pristhesancus plagipennis, adult. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Bee Killer Assassin Bug
The Bee Killer Assassin Bug is a slow-moving predator that lurks among foliage and on flowers to ambush other insects as food. It is widespread in eastern Qld and NSW.
Insects
Bugs
Porcupinefish, Diodon sp., swimbladder. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Porcupinefish Swimbladder
These strange leathery objects found occasionally on beaches are special internal organs of the porcupinefish. They are found throughout the Indo-west Pacific region, with ten species known from Queensland.
Fish
Eastern Long-necked Turtle, Chelodina longicollis. © Queensland Museum, Gary Cranitch. Freshwater turtles
Freshwater turtles are commonly seen in most Queensland waterways. Some species have long, snake-like necks, others are short-necked. Unlike the sea turtles and many foreign freshwater turtles, the Australian chelids fold their necks side-ways under the protective edge of the shell (pleurodirous). They have clawed, webbed feet and many species have distinct barbels on the chin.
Reptiles
Turtles
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