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Name Summary Subject categories
Common Crow, Euploea corinna, pinned adult male specimen. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Garden Butterflies
Butterflies are common visitors to backyards and a wide variety of species drop in to feed on nectar from blossoms. Some are regular garden-dwellers, their caterpillars feeding on widely-grown garden plants or street trees. A few species are even pests of citrus, palms and vegetables.
Insects
Butterflies
Tail-light Squid Shell, Spirula spirula. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Ram’s Horn Squid or Tail-light Squid
The Ram’s Horn Squid is a rarely seen deep-water species that has a light emitting organ at the tail-end of its body. The internal spirally-coiled shell, is composed of numerous gas-filled chambers that give the squid buoyancy. Tail-light Squids are cosmopolitan, occurring in all oceans.
Molluscs
Cephalopods
Asian Tramp Snails, Bradybaena similaris. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Asian Tramp Snail
The Asian Tramp Snail is a serious vine and market garden pest, that has become well-established in eastern Australia from Melbourne, Victoria, and around Bega on the south coast of New South Wales northwards to the Wet Tropics region of north-eastern Queensland.
Molluscs
Gastropods
Land snails
European Garden Snail, Cornu aspersum. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. European Garden Snail
The European Garden Snail is a very common garden and agricultural pest originally from Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, but is now a widespread invader throughout the world. Occurs throughout most of southern and eastern Australia and northwards to the Atherton Tablelands in north-eastern Queensland.
Molluscs
Gastropods
Land snails
Fraser's Banded Snail, Sphaerospira fraseri. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Fraser's Banded Snail
Fraser's Banded Snail is a native snail species that is quite large, its shell reaching a diameter of up to 56 mm. The shell ranges from a tawny yellow to dark brown base-colour with many black spiral bands and a dark area behind the outer lip. It occurs from around the Clarence River region in northern New South Wales northwards to about Gympie in south-eastern Queensland.
Molluscs
Gastropods
Land snails
Eugarie or Common Pipi (Latona deltoides). © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright Eugarie
The Eugarie (also known as the Common Pipi) is a mollusc that is a very common shell on surf beaches. Dead and broken shells of this species are a common feature on the shoreline. It is found Australia-wide.
Molluscs
Bivalves
Gaping Venus Clam, Marcia hiantina. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Gaping Venus Clam
The Gaping Venus Clam is one of the commoner intertidal to shallow subtidal bivalves in southern Queensland. They live buried in sand within a few centimetres of the surface, with only the tips of their siphons projecting.They are found in subtropical and tropical Australia.
Molluscs
Bivalves
Hairy Mussel, Trichomya hirsuta. © Queensland Museum, Gary Cranitch. Hairy Mussel
The Hairy Mussel occurs abundantly along the eastern and southern coasts of Australia as far south as Tasmania, particularly in estuarine localities. Shells of living animals are covered in short bristles. They occur in eastern and southern Australia.
Molluscs
Bivalves
Mud Ark, Anadara trapezia. © Queensland Museum, Gary Cranitch. Mud Ark
The Mud Ark is one of the most abundant bivalve molluscs on the mud- and sand-flats of eastern and southern Australia. They are common components of aboriginal shell middens.
Molluscs
Bivalves
Penguin Wing Oyster, Pteria penguin. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Penguin Wing Oyster
The Penguin Wing Oyster is the largest member of its genus, growing to over 200 mm and characterised by a black shell exterior and a very long extension of the hinge. The Penguin Wing Oyster lives in shallow water to depths of up to 20 m. It is found in subtropical and tropical Australia.
Molluscs
Bivalves
Giant Panda Snail, Hedleyella falconeri. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Giant Panda Snail
The Giant Panda Snail is Australia's largest land snail, the shell of which may reach 90 mm in height. This species is often encountered in the rainforests around Brisbane, particularly at night after rain when they are out feeding on fungi. Giant Panda Snails occur as far south as Barrington Tops in NSW.
Molluscs
Gastropods
Land snails
Pale Banded Snail, Sphaerospira mattea. © Queensland Museum. Pale Banded Snail
The Pale Banded Snail has, as the common name suggests, a pale, yellowish shell with many strong, dark brown spiral bands. It also has a dark brown patch behind the outer lip and on the umbilical region on the base of the shell. It ranges from about the Tweed river region in northern New South Wales northwards to the Broadsound Range, north-west of Rockhampton, and inland to the Carnarvon area, Queensland.
Molluscs
Gastropods
Land snails
Red-triangle Slug, Triboniophorus graeffei. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Red-triangle Slug
The Red-triangle Slug is common in the greater Brisbane region of south-eastern Queensland. This species which lives in coastal forests from around Wollongong NSW north to Mossman in northern Qld has many colour forms.
Molluscs
Gastropods
Land snails
Steve Irwin's Tree Snail, Crikey steveirwini. © Queensland Museum, Gary Cranitch. Steve Irwin's Treesnail
Steve Irwin's Treesnail is a strikingly coloured treesnail described in 2009 in memory of the late Steve Irwin, wildlife warrior, environmental educator and Queensland Museum medalist. It occurs in the Central Wet Tropics region of north-eastern Queensland.
Molluscs
Gastropods
Land snails
Scaly Scallop, Scaeochlamys livida. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Scaly Scallop
The Scaly Scallop, as its common name implies, is sculptured with numerous, short vertical scales. The species grows to 60-70 mm and is fished commercially in southern Australian states. It is widespread along the Australian coast.
Molluscs
Bivalves
Strawberry Cockle, Fragum unedo. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Strawberry Cockle
The Strawberry Cockle is creamy white with strawberry-red scales and has a solid, strongly ribbed shell. Like many other bivalves, it feeds by using a siphon to draw in water and pass it to the gills. Strawberry Cockles are common in the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones throughout the Indo-West Pacific.
Molluscs
Bivalves
Sydney Rock Oyster, Saccostrea glomerata. © Queensland Museum, Gary Cranitch. Sydney Rock Oyster
The Sydney Rock Oyster is the most ecologically and commercially important species of the oyster family from Australian waters. It is found along the east coast of Australia, and New Zealand.
Molluscs
Bivalves
White Hammer Oyster, Malleus albus. © Queensland Museum, Gary Cranitch. White Hammer Oyster
The White Hammer Oyster is one of the most unusual types of marine bivalve molluscs and easily recognised by its greatly elongate hinge extensions (recalling a hammer shape) and somewhat corrugated valves. It is found in subtropical and tropical Australia.
Molluscs
Bivalves
Oak Chiton, Onithochiton quercinus. © Queensland Museum, Jeff Wright. Oak Chiton
The Oak Chiton is easily recognised by its mottled grey, green, and black leathery girdle. It lives exposed on rocks in the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones. It is found from Central Queensland southwards to southern WA.
Molluscs
Chitons
Sand-dusted Cone, Conus arenatus. © Queensland Museum, Gary Cranitch. Gastropods
Gastropods form the largest class of molluscs and include many well-known groups such as cowries, cone snails, tritons, periwinkles and whelks. To date approximately 950 species of gastropods have been recorded from the Bay.
Molluscs
Gastropods
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