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72 results. Displaying results 1 - 40.

Ram’s Horn Squid or Tail-light Squid
Summary
The Ram’s Horn Squid is a rarely seen deep-water species that has a light emitting organ at the tail-end of its body. The internal spirally-coiled shell, is composed of numerous gas-filled chambers that give the squid buoyancy. Tail-light Squids are cosmopolitan, occurring in all oceans.
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Oak Chiton
Summary
The Oak Chiton is easily recognised by its mottled grey, green, and black leathery girdle. It lives exposed on rocks in the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones. It is found from Central Queensland southwards to southern WA.
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Gastropods
Summary
Gastropods form the largest class of molluscs and include many well-known groups such as cowries, cone snails, tritons, periwinkles and whelks. To date approximately 950 species of gastropods have been recorded from the Bay.
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Bivalves
Summary
Bivalves are molluscs that have a shell composed of two valves attached by a skin-like ligament and usually interlocking (hinge) teeth. The class includes many commercially significant species and numerous ecologically dominant groups. About 350 species have been recorded from Moreton Bay.
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Cream Wafer Tellin
Summary
The Cream Wafer Tellin lives deeply burrowed in shallow subtidal sandy habitats. Found in tropical and subtropical Australia.
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Eugarie
Summary
The Eugarie (also known as the Common Pipi) is a mollusc that is a very common shell on surf beaches. Dead and broken shells of this species are a common feature on the shoreline. It is found Australia-wide.
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Gaping Venus Clam
Summary
The Gaping Venus Clam is one of the commoner intertidal to shallow subtidal bivalves in southern Queensland. They live buried in sand within a few centimetres of the surface, with only the tips of their siphons projecting.They are found in subtropical and tropical Australia.
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Hairy Mussel
Summary
The Hairy Mussel occurs abundantly along the eastern and southern coasts of Australia as far south as Tasmania, particularly in estuarine localities. Shells of living animals are covered in short bristles. They occur in eastern and southern Australia.
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Mud Ark
Summary
The Mud Ark is one of the most abundant bivalve molluscs on the mud- and sand-flats of eastern and southern Australia. They are common components of aboriginal shell middens.
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Penguin Wing Oyster
Summary
The Penguin Wing Oyster is the largest member of its genus, growing to over 200 mm and characterised by a black shell exterior and a very long extension of the hinge. The Penguin Wing Oyster lives in shallow water to depths of up to 20 m. It is found in subtropical and tropical Australia.
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Scaly Scallop
Summary
The Scaly Scallop, as its common name implies, is sculptured with numerous, short vertical scales. The species grows to 60-70 mm and is fished commercially in southern Australian states. It is widespread along the Australian coast.
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Strawberry Cockle
Summary
The Strawberry Cockle is creamy white with strawberry-red scales and has a solid, strongly ribbed shell. Like many other bivalves, it feeds by using a siphon to draw in water and pass it to the gills. Strawberry Cockles are common in the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones throughout the Indo-West Pacific.
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Sydney Rock Oyster
Summary
The Sydney Rock Oyster is the most ecologically and commercially important species of the oyster family from Australian waters. It is found along the east coast of Australia, and New Zealand.
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White Hammer Oyster
Summary
The White Hammer Oyster is one of the most unusual types of marine bivalve molluscs and easily recognised by its greatly elongate hinge extensions (recalling a hammer shape) and somewhat corrugated valves. It is found in subtropical and tropical Australia.
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Giant Squid
Summary
Giant Squid are among the world's largest molluscs (the longest recorded being approximately 13 metres), and heaviest invertebrates (up to half a tonne). Only the Colossal Squid is thought to be larger (14 metres).
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Cephalopods
Summary
This entirely marine class includes such familiar animals as the octopus, cuttlefish and squid and also the so-called ‘living-fossil’ Nautilus and the extinct ammonites. As the name suggests the limbs are closely associated with the head, and in most cephalopods these limbs (arms and tentacles) possess numerous suckers which help to secure prey. Many species of squid, octopus and cuttlefish are of major commercial importance (primarily as seafood).
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Cuttlebone
Summary
Cuttlebones are hard, ridged, shield-like objects that have a soft spongy inner layer and are frequently found on beaches, often in great clumps after storms. They are in fact the internal shells of cuttlefish, relatives of the octopus and squid. There are many species worldwide and several unique ones in Queensland’s waters.
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Blue-lined Octopus
Summary
The Blue-lined Octopus grows to about 15 cm in armspan, but is often much smaller. It is easily recognised by the iridescent blue lines on the body and linked blue rings on the arms and webs, however this is a warning colouration and only obvious when the animal is aggravated. This species is only found from southern Queensland to southern NSW.
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Fragile File Clam
Summary
File Clams live on the underside of rocks, or under shell rubble in rock pools in the intertidal zone. They filter feed on plankton, and their swimming behaviour undoubtedly helps them evade predators. File Clams occur throughout the Indo-west Pacific.
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Chitons
Summary
Chitons differ from other molluscs by having an 8-plated shell, which is held together by a tough band of tissues known as the girdle. The various types of chitons are distinguished by colour and structural differences in the plates and girdle
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